Virtual Network with VPN Gateway location.

Thomas Murnane 56 Reputation points
2022-01-24T23:02:40.933+00:00

I'll keep this simple - we have 2 offices, one in CA and one in MA. I'm in the early stages of testing out our product in the cloud to someday have a cloud offering to our clients. A prior system support person had created a VNET with VPN GW to on-prem in South Central US - thinking this would be cost-effective for the company - not worried so much on latency for testing purposes.

Does this make sense? Would it be more cost-effective in having the VNET in the East coast since all our dev/QA is done in MA and the support and presales are on the West coast?

I have to go through a lot of security channels to set up a new VPN GW. But would like to explain why.

Azure Virtual Network
Azure Virtual Network
An Azure networking service that is used to provision private networks and optionally to connect to on-premises datacenters.
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  1. SaiKishor-MSFT 17,171 Reputation points
    2022-01-26T23:26:43.697+00:00

    @Thomas Murnane Thank you for reaching out to Microsoft Q&A. I understand that you are having questions regarding the location for setting up a Virtual Network with VPN Gateway for your use case.

    I see that you have Offices in CA and MA and your current Vnet is in South Central US. I see that you want to know if it is more cost effective to have the VNet in East US when compared to South Central US.

    As seen from the Pricing Calculator, US East may could be a cheaper region when compared to other regions so it can be an option for you. However, locating resources in a cheaper region should not negate the cost of network ingress and egress or by degraded application performance because of increased latency.

    I would suggest you to also verify other details such as Network Latency between your regions and Azure VMs in the locations that you are considering for your services to determine which location suits your need. You can use a tool like PsPing to check for latency. PsPing is a command-line utility for measuring network performance, it implements Ping functionality, TCP ping, latency and bandwidth measurement. Hope this helps.

    Please let us know if you have any further questions and we will be glad to assist you further. Thank you!

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