Do I need to migrate SSIS 2019 packages to SSIS 2022?

Nick Ryan 191 Reputation points
2024-01-22T20:42:04.33+00:00

If I run the packages with the current target server as 2019 on a SSIS 2022 server, is there any disadvantage? I know that I simply have to open each in Visual Studio, change the target server to 2022 and save but there are a huge number of them so that's a big job. When I change the Target Server version, what will it actually do to the packages? Maybe recompile scripts with a new .NET version?

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SQL Server Integration Services
A Microsoft platform for building enterprise-level data integration and data transformations solutions.
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  1. Yitzhak Khabinsky 24,726 Reputation points
    2024-01-22T22:10:33.5233333+00:00

    Hi @Nick Ryan,

    I know that I simply have to open each in Visual Studio, change the target server to 2022 and save but there are a huge number of them so that's a big job.

    It is done just once on a SSIS Project level, not on the individual SSIS package level, via TargetServerVersion setting value. Please see below. It is better to migrate your SSIS Projects in Visual Studio manually. It can show some potential errors and bugs. When you are deploying SSIS project for SQL Server 2019 to SSIS run-time server 2022, that switch/migration to SSIS 2022 is happening anyway behind the scenes.

    Maybe recompile scripts with a new .NET version?

    SSIS is using up to the latest version of the earlier .Net Framework v.4.8. It cannot use .Net Core versions 5,6,7,or 8. SSIS - TargetServerVersion_2

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  1. ZoeHui-MSFT 30,881 Reputation points
    2024-01-23T02:55:04.9+00:00

    Hi @Nick Ryan, I do not think it is necessary to migrate SSIS 2019 packages to SSIS 2022. There are no particularly major updates between these two versions It's probably a good idea to keep the status quo. Regards, Zoe Hui


    If the answer is helpful, please click "Accept Answer" and upvote it.

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  2. Nick Ryan 191 Reputation points
    2024-01-25T21:41:03.0966667+00:00

    There's an additional complication in this situation which makes it not quite as simple as described in the first answer. This arises from the fact every package uses script tasks. After changing the Deployment Target Version, an upgrade is run on all the packages in the project. This upgrade doesn't affect the script tasks. In order to upgrade the script tasks, I have to open each and save it. If I don't do that then it upgrades the script tasks automatically each time the package is loaded by the job that runs it adding an appreciable amount of time to each run. It may just be my installation of Visual Studio (2019) but I've found I can't open more than around 6 to 8 packages at a time in order to affect that script upgrade. If I try, Visual Studio crashes (just disappears) after opening 6 to 8. Even if I open in batches of 6, it crashes after 3 or 4 repetitions. This is a bit of a pain with around 1000 packages to update.

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