Quickstart: Deploy your code to Azure Container Apps

This article demonstrates how to build and deploy a microservice to Azure Container Apps from a source repository using the programming language of your choice.

This quickstart is the first in a series of articles that walk you through how to use core capabilities within Azure Container Apps. The first step is to create a back end web API service that returns a static collection of music albums.

The following screenshot shows the output from the album API deployed in this quickstart.

Screenshot of response from albums API endpoint.

Prerequisites

To complete this project, you'll need the following items:

Requirement Instructions
Azure account If you don't have one, create an account for free. You need the Contributor or Owner permission on the Azure subscription to proceed.

Refer to Assign Azure roles using the Azure portal for details.
GitHub Account Get an account for free.
git Install git
Azure CLI Install the Azure CLI.
Requirement Instructions
Azure account If you don't have one, create an account for free. You need the Contributor or Owner permission on the Azure subscription to proceed. Refer to Assign Azure roles using the Azure portal for details.
GitHub Account Get an account for free.
git Install git
Azure CLI Install the Azure CLI.
Docker Desktop Docker provides installers that configure the Docker environment on macOS, Windows, and Linux.

From your command prompt, type docker to ensure Docker is running.

Setup

To sign in to Azure from the CLI, run the following command and follow the prompts to complete the authentication process.

az login

Ensure you're running the latest version of the CLI via the upgrade command.

az upgrade

Next, install or update the Azure Container Apps extension for the CLI.

az extension add --name containerapp --upgrade

Register the Microsoft.App and Microsoft.OperationalInsights namespaces if you haven't already registered them in your Azure subscription.

az provider register --namespace Microsoft.App
az provider register --namespace Microsoft.OperationalInsights

Now that your Azure CLI setup is complete, you can define the environment variables that are used throughout this article.

Define the following variables in your bash shell.

RESOURCE_GROUP="album-containerapps"
LOCATION="canadacentral"
ENVIRONMENT="env-album-containerapps"
API_NAME="album-api"
FRONTEND_NAME="album-ui"
GITHUB_USERNAME="<YOUR_GITHUB_USERNAME>"

Before you run this command, make sure to replace <YOUR_GITHUB_USERNAME> with your GitHub username.

Next, define a container registry name unique to you.

ACR_NAME="acaalbums"$GITHUB_USERNAME

Prepare the GitHub repository

Navigate to the repository for your preferred language and fork the repository.

Select the Fork button at the top of the album API repo to fork the repo to your account.

Now you can clone your fork of the sample repository.

Use the following git command to clone your forked repo into the code-to-cloud folder:

git clone https://github.com/$GITHUB_USERNAME/containerapps-albumapi-csharp.git code-to-cloud

Next, change the directory into the root of the cloned repo.

cd code-to-cloud/src

Create an Azure Resource Group

Create a resource group to organize the services related to your container app deployment.

az group create \
  --name $RESOURCE_GROUP \
  --location "$LOCATION"

Create an Azure Container Registry

Next, create an Azure Container Registry (ACR) instance in your resource group to store the album API container image once it's built.

az acr create \
  --resource-group $RESOURCE_GROUP \
  --name $ACR_NAME \
  --sku Basic \
  --admin-enabled true

Build your application

With ACR tasks, you can build and push the docker image for the album API without installing Docker locally.

Build the container with ACR

Run the following command to initiate the image build and push process using ACR. The . at the end of the command represents the docker build context, meaning this command should be run within the src folder where the Dockerfile is located.

az acr build --registry $ACR_NAME --image $API_NAME .

Output from the az acr build command shows the upload progress of the source code to Azure and the details of the docker build and docker push operations.

Build your application

The following steps, demonstrate how to build your container image locally using Docker and push the image to the new container registry.

Build the container with Docker

The following command builds a container image for the album API and tags it with the fully qualified name of the ACR login server. The . at the end of the command represents the docker build context, meaning this command should be run within the src folder where the Dockerfile is located.

docker build --tag $ACR_NAME.azurecr.io/$API_NAME .

Push the image to your container registry

First, sign in to your Azure Container Registry.

az acr login --name $ACR_NAME

Now, push the image to your registry.

docker push $ACR_NAME.azurecr.io/$API_NAME

Create a Container Apps environment

The Azure Container Apps environment acts as a secure boundary around a group of container apps.

Create the Container Apps environment using the following command.

az containerapp env create \
  --name $ENVIRONMENT \
  --resource-group $RESOURCE_GROUP \
  --location "$LOCATION"

Deploy your image to a container app

Now that you have an environment created, you can create and deploy your container app with the az containerapp create command.

Create and deploy your container app with the following command.

az containerapp create \
  --name $API_NAME \
  --resource-group $RESOURCE_GROUP \
  --environment $ENVIRONMENT \
  --image $ACR_NAME.azurecr.io/$API_NAME \
  --target-port 3500 \
  --ingress 'external' \
  --registry-server $ACR_NAME.azurecr.io \
  --query properties.configuration.ingress.fqdn
  • By setting --ingress to external, your container app will be accessible from the public internet.

  • The target-port is set to 3500 to match the port that the container is listening to for requests.

  • Without a query property, the call to az containerapp create returns a JSON response that includes a rich set of details about the application. Adding a query parameter filters the output to just the app's fully qualified domain name (FQDN).

Verify deployment

Copy the FQDN to a web browser. From your web browser, navigate to the /albums endpoint of the FQDN.

Screenshot of response from albums API endpoint.

Clean up resources

If you're not going to continue on to the Communication between microservices tutorial, you can remove the Azure resources created during this quickstart. Run the following command to delete the resource group along with all the resources created in this quickstart.

az group delete --name $RESOURCE_GROUP

Tip

Having issues? Let us know on GitHub by opening an issue in the Azure Container Apps repo.

Next steps

This quickstart is the entrypoint for a set of progressive tutorials that showcase the various features within Azure Container Apps. Continue on to learn how to enable communication from a web front end that calls the API you deployed in this article.