Microsoft Azure Resource Manager client library for .NET

Microsoft Azure Resource Manager is the deployment and management service for Azure. It provides a management layer that enables you to create, update, and delete resources in your Azure account.

This library provides resource group and resource management capabilities for Microsoft Azure.

This library follows the new Azure SDK guidelines, and provides many core capabilities:

- Support MSAL.NET, Azure.Identity is out of box for supporting MSAL.NET.
- Support [OpenTelemetry](https://opentelemetry.io/) for distributed tracing.
- HTTP pipeline with custom policies.
- Better error-handling.
- Support uniform telemetry across all languages.

Getting started

Install the package

Install the Microsoft Azure Resources management core library for .NET with NuGet:

dotnet add package Azure.ResourceManager

Prerequisites

Authenticate the Client

The default option to create an authenticated client is to use DefaultAzureCredential. Since all management APIs go through the same endpoint, in order to interact with resources, only one top-level ArmClient has to be created.

To authenticate to Azure and create an ArmClient, do the following code:

using System;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using Azure.Core;
using Azure.Identity;
using Azure.ResourceManager;
using Azure.ResourceManager.Compute;
using Azure.ResourceManager.Resources;

// Code omitted for brevity

ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());

More documentation for the Azure.Identity.DefaultAzureCredential class can be found in this document.

Key concepts

Understanding Azure Resource Hierarchy

To reduce both the number of clients needed to perform common tasks, and the number of redundant parameters that each of those clients take, we've introduced an object hierarchy in the SDK that mimics the object hierarchy in Azure. Each resource client in the SDK has methods to access the resource clients of its children that are already scoped to the proper subscription and resource group.

To accomplish this goal, we're introducing three standard types for all resources in Azure:

[Resource]Resource.cs

This class represents a full resource client object that contains a Data property exposing the details as a [Resource]Data type. It also has access to all of the operations on that resource without needing to pass in scope parameters such as subscription ID or resource name. This resource class makes it convenient to directly execute operations on the result of list calls since everything is returned as a full resource client now.

ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
string resourceGroupName = "myResourceGroup";
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync(resourceGroupName);
await foreach (VirtualMachineResource virtualMachine in resourceGroup.GetVirtualMachines())
{
    //previously we would have to take the resourceGroupName and the vmName from the vm object
    //and pass those into the powerOff method as well as we would need to execute that on a separate compute client
    await virtualMachine.PowerOffAsync(WaitUntil.Completed);
}

[Resource]Data.cs

This class represents the model that makes up a given resource. Typically, this class is the response data from a service call such as HTTP GET and provides details about the underlying resource. Previously, this class was represented by a Model class.

[Resource]Collection.cs

This class represents the operations you can perform on a collection of resources belonging to a specific parent resource. This class provides most of the logical collection operations.

Collection Behavior Collection Method
Iterate/List GetAll()
Index Get(string name)
Add CreateOrUpdate(string name, [Resource]Data data)
Contains Exists(string name)

For most things, the parent will be a ResourceGroup. For example, a Subnet is a child of a VirtualNetwork and a ResourceGroup is a child of a Subscription.

Putting it all together

Imagine that our company requires all virtual machines to be tagged with the owner. We're tasked with writing a program to add the tag to any missing virtual machines in a given resource group.

// First we construct our client
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());

// Next we get a resource group object
// ResourceGroupResource is a [Resource] object from above
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync("myRgName");

// Next we get the collection for the virtual machines
// vmCollection is a [Resource]Collection object from above
VirtualMachineCollection virtualMachines = resourceGroup.GetVirtualMachines();

// Next we loop over all vms in the collection
// Each vm is a [Resource] object from above
await foreach (VirtualMachineResource virtualMachine in virtualMachines)
{
   // We access the [Resource]Data properties from vm.Data
   if (!virtualMachine.Data.Tags.ContainsKey("owner"))
   {
       // We can also access all operations from vm since it is already scoped for us
       await virtualMachine.AddTagAsync("owner", "tagValue");
   }
}

Structured Resource Identifier

Resource IDs contain useful information about the resource itself, but they're plain strings that have to be parsed. Instead of implementing your own parsing logic, you can use a ResourceIdentifier object that will do the parsing for you: new ResourceIdentifer("myid");.

Example: Parsing an ID using a ResourceIdentifier object

ResourceIdentifier id = new ResourceIdentifier("/subscriptions/aaaaaaaa-bbbb-cccc-dddd-eeeeeeeeeeee/resourceGroups/workshop2021-rg/providers/Microsoft.Network/virtualNetworks/myVnet/subnets/mySubnet");
Console.WriteLine($"Subscription: {id.SubscriptionId}");
Console.WriteLine($"ResourceGroupResource: {id.ResourceGroupName}");
Console.WriteLine($"Vnet: {id.Parent.Name}");
Console.WriteLine($"Subnet: {id.Name}");

Managing Existing Resources by Resouce Identifier

Performing operations on resources that already exist is a common use case when using the management client libraries. In this scenario, you usually have the identifier of the resource you want to work on as a string. Although the new object hierarchy is great for provisioning, and working within the scope of a given parent, it isn't the most efficient when it comes to this specific scenario.

Here's an example how you can access an AvailabilitySet object and manage it directly with its id:

ResourceIdentifier id = new ResourceIdentifier("/subscriptions/aaaaaaaa-bbbb-cccc-dddd-eeeeeeeeeeee/resourceGroups/workshop2021-rg/providers/Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets/ws2021availSet");
// We construct a new client to work with
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
// Next we get the collection of subscriptions
SubscriptionCollection subscriptions = client.GetSubscriptions();
// Next we get the specific subscription this resource belongs to
SubscriptionResource subscription = await subscriptions.GetAsync(id.SubscriptionId);
// Next we get the collection of resource groups that belong to that subscription
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
// Next we get the specific resource group this resource belongs to
ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync(id.ResourceGroupName);
// Next we get the collection of availability sets that belong to that resource group
AvailabilitySetCollection availabilitySets = resourceGroup.GetAvailabilitySets();
// Finally we get the resource itself
// Note: for this last step in this example, Azure.ResourceManager.Compute is needed
AvailabilitySetResource availabilitySet = await availabilitySets.GetAsync(id.Name);

This approach required much code and three API calls to Azure. The same can be done with less code and without any API calls by using extension methods that we've provided on the client itself. These extension methods allow you to pass in a resource identifier and retrieve a scoped resource client. The object returned is a [Resource] mentioned above, since it hasn't reached out to Azure to retrieve the data yet the Data property will be null.

So, the previous example would end up looking like this:

ResourceIdentifier resourceId = new ResourceIdentifier("/subscriptions/aaaaaaaa-bbbb-cccc-dddd-eeeeeeeeeeee/resourceGroups/workshop2021-rg/providers/Microsoft.Compute/availabilitySets/ws2021availSet");
// We construct a new client to work with
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
// Next we get the AvailabilitySetResource resource client from the client
// The method takes in a ResourceIdentifier but we can use the implicit cast from string
AvailabilitySetResource availabilitySet = client.GetAvailabilitySetResource(resourceId);
// At this point availabilitySet.Data will be null and trying to access it will throw
// If we want to retrieve the objects data we can simply call get
availabilitySet = await availabilitySet.GetAsync();
// we now have the data representing the availabilitySet
Console.WriteLine(availabilitySet.Data.Name);

We also provide an option that if you only know the pieces that make up the ResourceIdentifier each resource provides a static method to construct the full string from those pieces. The above example would then look like this.

string subscriptionId = "aaaaaaaa-bbbb-cccc-dddd-eeeeeeeeeeee";
string resourceGroupName = "workshop2021-rg";
string availabilitySetName = "ws2021availSet";
ResourceIdentifier resourceId = AvailabilitySetResource.CreateResourceIdentifier(subscriptionId, resourceGroupName, availabilitySetName);
// We construct a new client to work with
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
// Next we get the AvailabilitySetResource resource client from the client
// The method takes in a ResourceIdentifier but we can use the implicit cast from string
AvailabilitySetResource availabilitySet = client.GetAvailabilitySetResource(resourceId);
// At this point availabilitySet.Data will be null and trying to access it will throw
// If we want to retrieve the objects data we can simply call get
availabilitySet = await availabilitySet.GetAsync();
// we now have the data representing the availabilitySet
Console.WriteLine(availabilitySet.Data.Name);

Check if a [Resource] exists

If you aren't sure if a resource you want to get exists, or you just want to check if it exists, you can use Exists() method, which can be invoked from any [Resource]Collection class.

Exists() and ExistsAsync() return Response<bool> where the bool will be false if the specified resource doesn't exist. Both of these methods still give you access to the underlying raw response.

Before these methods were introduced, you would need to catch the RequestFailedException and inspect the status code for 404.

ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
string resourceGroupName = "myRgName";

try
{
    ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync(resourceGroupName);
    // At this point, we are sure that myRG is a not null Resource Group, so we can use this object to perform any operations we want.
}
catch (RequestFailedException ex) when (ex.Status == 404)
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Resource Group {resourceGroupName} does not exist.");
}

Now with these convenience methods we can do the following code.

ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
string resourceGroupName = "myRgName";

bool exists = await resourceGroups.ExistsAsync(resourceGroupName);

if (exists)
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Resource Group {resourceGroupName} exists.");

    // We can get the resource group now that we know it exists.
    // This does introduce a small race condition where resource group could have been deleted between the check and the get.
    ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync(resourceGroupName);
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Resource Group {resourceGroupName} does not exist.");
}

Examples

Create a resource group

// First, initialize the ArmClient and get the default subscription
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
// Now we get a ResourceGroupResource collection for that subscription
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();

// With the collection, we can create a new resource group with an specific name
string resourceGroupName = "myRgName";
AzureLocation location = AzureLocation.WestUS2;
ResourceGroupData resourceGroupData = new ResourceGroupData(location);
ArmOperation<ResourceGroupResource> operation = await resourceGroups.CreateOrUpdateAsync(WaitUntil.Completed, resourceGroupName, resourceGroupData);
ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = operation.Value;

List all resource groups

// First, initialize the ArmClient and get the default subscription
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
// Now we get a ResourceGroupResource collection for that subscription
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
// We can then iterate over this collection to get the resources in the collection
await foreach (ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup in resourceGroups)
{
    Console.WriteLine(resourceGroup.Data.Name);
}

Update a resource group

// Note: Resource group named 'myRgName' should exist for this example to work.
ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
string resourceGroupName = "myRgName";
ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync(resourceGroupName);
resourceGroup = await resourceGroup.AddTagAsync("key", "value");

Delete a resource group

ArmClient client = new ArmClient(new DefaultAzureCredential());
SubscriptionResource subscription = await client.GetDefaultSubscriptionAsync();
ResourceGroupCollection resourceGroups = subscription.GetResourceGroups();
string resourceGroupName = "myRgName";
ResourceGroupResource resourceGroup = await resourceGroups.GetAsync(resourceGroupName);
await resourceGroup.DeleteAsync(WaitUntil.Completed);

For more detailed examples, take a look at samples we have available.

Azure Resource Manager Tests

To run test: dotnet test

To run test with code coverage and auto generate an html report: dotnet test /p:CollectCoverage=true /p:CoverletOutputFormat=cobertura

Coverage report will be placed in your path relative to azure-proto-core-test in/coverage in html format for viewing

Reports can also be viewed VS or VsCode with the proper viewer plugin

A terse report will also be displayed on the command line when running.

run test with single file or test

To run test with code coverage and auto generate an html report with just a single test: dotnet test /p:CollectCoverage=true /p:CoverletOutputFormat=cobertura --filter <test-to-run>

Troubleshooting

Next steps

More sample code

Other Documentation

If you're migrating from the old SDK, check out this Migration guide.

For more information about Microsoft Azure SDK, see this website.

Contributing

For details on contributing to this repository, see the contributing guide.

This project welcomes contributions and suggestions. Most contributions require you to agree to a Contributor License Agreement (CLA) declaring that you have the right to, and actually do, grant us the rights to use your contribution. For details, visit https://cla.microsoft.com.

When you submit a pull request, a CLA-bot will automatically determine whether you need to provide a CLA and decorate the PR appropriately (for example, label, comment). Follow the instructions provided by the bot. You'll only need to do this action once across all repositories using our CLA.

This project has adopted the Microsoft Open Source Code of Conduct. For more information, see the Code of Conduct FAQ or contact opencode@microsoft.com with any other questions or comments.