How to use a JSON document object model in System.Text.Json

This article shows how to use a JSON document object model (DOM) for random access to data in a JSON payload.

JSON DOM choices

Working with a DOM is an alternative to deserialization with JsonSerializer when:

  • You don't have a type to deserialize into.
  • The JSON you receive doesn't have a fixed schema and must be inspected to know what it contains.

System.Text.Json provides two ways to build a JSON DOM:

  • JsonDocument provides the ability to build a read-only DOM by using Utf8JsonReader. The JSON elements that compose the payload can be accessed via the JsonElement type. The JsonElement type provides array and object enumerators along with APIs to convert JSON text to common .NET types. JsonDocument exposes a RootElement property. For more information, see Use JsonDocument later in this article.

  • JsonNode and the classes that derive from it in the System.Text.Json.Nodes namespace provide the ability to create a mutable DOM. The JSON elements that compose the payload can be accessed via the JsonNode, JsonObject, JsonArray, JsonValue, and JsonElement types. For more information, see Use JsonNode later in this article.

Consider the following factors when choosing between JsonDocument and JsonNode:

  • The JsonNode DOM can be changed after it's created. The JsonDocument DOM is immutable.
  • The JsonDocument DOM provides faster access to its data.

Use JsonNode

The following example shows how to use JsonNode and the other types in the System.Text.Json.Nodes namespace to:

  • Create a DOM from a JSON string
  • Write JSON from a DOM.
  • Get a value, object, or array from a DOM.
using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Nodes;

namespace JsonNodeFromStringExample;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        string jsonString =
@"{
  ""Date"": ""2019-08-01T00:00:00"",
  ""Temperature"": 25,
  ""Summary"": ""Hot"",
  ""DatesAvailable"": [
    ""2019-08-01T00:00:00"",
    ""2019-08-02T00:00:00""
  ],
  ""TemperatureRanges"": {
      ""Cold"": {
          ""High"": 20,
          ""Low"": -10
      },
      ""Hot"": {
          ""High"": 60,
          ""Low"": 20
      }
  }
}
";
        // Create a JsonNode DOM from a JSON string.
        JsonNode forecastNode = JsonNode.Parse(jsonString)!;

        // Write JSON from a JsonNode
        var options = new JsonSerializerOptions { WriteIndented = true };
        Console.WriteLine(forecastNode!.ToJsonString(options));
        // output:
        //{
        //  "Date": "2019-08-01T00:00:00",
        //  "Temperature": 25,
        //  "Summary": "Hot",
        //  "DatesAvailable": [
        //    "2019-08-01T00:00:00",
        //    "2019-08-02T00:00:00"
        //  ],
        //  "TemperatureRanges": {
        //    "Cold": {
        //      "High": 20,
        //      "Low": -10
        //    },
        //    "Hot": {
        //      "High": 60,
        //      "Low": 20
        //    }
        //  }
        //}

        // Get value from a JsonNode.
        JsonNode temperatureNode = forecastNode!["Temperature"]!;
        Console.WriteLine($"Type={temperatureNode.GetType()}");
        Console.WriteLine($"JSON={temperatureNode.ToJsonString()}");
        //output:
        //Type = System.Text.Json.Nodes.JsonValue`1[System.Text.Json.JsonElement]
        //JSON = 25

        // Get a typed value from a JsonNode.
        int temperatureInt = (int)forecastNode!["Temperature"]!;
        Console.WriteLine($"Value={temperatureInt}");
        //output:
        //Value=25

        // Get a typed value from a JsonNode by using GetValue<T>.
        temperatureInt = forecastNode!["Temperature"]!.GetValue<int>();
        Console.WriteLine($"TemperatureInt={temperatureInt}");
        //output:
        //Value=25

        // Get a JSON object from a JsonNode.
        JsonNode temperatureRanges = forecastNode!["TemperatureRanges"]!;
        Console.WriteLine($"Type={temperatureRanges.GetType()}");
        Console.WriteLine($"JSON={temperatureRanges.ToJsonString()}");
        //output:
        //Type = System.Text.Json.Nodes.JsonObject
        //JSON = { "Cold":{ "High":20,"Low":-10},"Hot":{ "High":60,"Low":20} }

        // Get a JSON array from a JsonNode.
        JsonNode datesAvailable = forecastNode!["DatesAvailable"]!;
        Console.WriteLine($"Type={datesAvailable.GetType()}");
        Console.WriteLine($"JSON={datesAvailable.ToJsonString()}");
        //output:
        //datesAvailable Type = System.Text.Json.Nodes.JsonArray
        //datesAvailable JSON =["2019-08-01T00:00:00", "2019-08-02T00:00:00"]

        // Get an array element value from a JsonArray.
        JsonNode firstDateAvailable = datesAvailable[0]!;
        Console.WriteLine($"Type={firstDateAvailable.GetType()}");
        Console.WriteLine($"JSON={firstDateAvailable.ToJsonString()}");
        //output:
        //Type = System.Text.Json.Nodes.JsonValue`1[System.Text.Json.JsonElement]
        //JSON = "2019-08-01T00:00:00"

        // Get a typed value by chaining references.
        int coldHighTemperature = (int)forecastNode["TemperatureRanges"]!["Cold"]!["High"]!;
        Console.WriteLine($"TemperatureRanges.Cold.High={coldHighTemperature}");
        //output:
        //TemperatureRanges.Cold.High = 20

        // Parse a JSON array
        var datesNode = JsonNode.Parse(@"[""2019-08-01T00:00:00"",""2019-08-02T00:00:00""]");
        JsonNode firstDate = datesNode![0]!.GetValue<DateTime>();
        Console.WriteLine($"firstDate={ firstDate}");
        //output:
        //firstDate = "2019-08-01T00:00:00"
    }
}

Create a JsonNode DOM with object initializers and make changes

The following example shows how to:

  • Create a DOM by using object initializers.
  • Make changes to a DOM.
using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Nodes;

namespace JsonNodeFromObjectExample;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        // Create a new JsonObject using object initializers.
        var forecastObject = new JsonObject
        {
            ["Date"] = new DateTime(2019, 8, 1),
            ["Temperature"] = 25,
            ["Summary"] = "Hot",
            ["DatesAvailable"] = new JsonArray(
                new DateTime(2019, 8, 1), new DateTime(2019, 8, 2)),
            ["TemperatureRanges"] = new JsonObject
            {
                ["Cold"] = new JsonObject
                {
                    ["High"] = 20,
                    ["Low"] = -10
                }
            },
            ["SummaryWords"] = new JsonArray("Cool", "Windy", "Humid")
        };

        // Add an object.
        forecastObject!["TemperatureRanges"]!["Hot"] =
            new JsonObject { ["High"] = 60, ["Low"] = 20 };

        // Remove a property.
        forecastObject.Remove("SummaryWords");

        // Change the value of a property.
        forecastObject["Date"] = new DateTime(2019, 8, 3);

        var options = new JsonSerializerOptions { WriteIndented = true };
        Console.WriteLine(forecastObject.ToJsonString(options));
        //output:
        //{
        //  "Date": "2019-08-03T00:00:00",
        //  "Temperature": 25,
        //  "Summary": "Hot",
        //  "DatesAvailable": [
        //    "2019-08-01T00:00:00",
        //    "2019-08-02T00:00:00"
        //  ],
        //  "TemperatureRanges": {
        //    "Cold": {
        //      "High": 20,
        //      "Low": -10
        //    },
        //    "Hot": {
        //      "High": 60,
        //      "Low": 20
        //    }
        //  }
        //}
    }
}

Deserialize subsections of a JSON payload

The following example shows how to use JsonNode to navigate to a subsection of a JSON tree and deserialize a single value, a custom type, or an array from that subsection.

using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Nodes;

namespace JsonNodePOCOExample;

public class TemperatureRanges : Dictionary<string, HighLowTemps>
{
}

public class HighLowTemps
{
    public int High { get; set; }
    public int Low { get; set; }
}

public class Program
{
    public static DateTime[]? DatesAvailable { get; set; }

    public static void Main()
    {
        string jsonString =
@"{
  ""Date"": ""2019-08-01T00:00:00"",
  ""Temperature"": 25,
  ""Summary"": ""Hot"",
  ""DatesAvailable"": [
    ""2019-08-01T00:00:00"",
    ""2019-08-02T00:00:00""
  ],
  ""TemperatureRanges"": {
      ""Cold"": {
          ""High"": 20,
          ""Low"": -10
      },
      ""Hot"": {
          ""High"": 60,
          ""Low"": 20
      }
  }
}
";
        // Parse all of the JSON.
        JsonNode forecastNode = JsonNode.Parse(jsonString)!;

        // Get a single value
        int hotHigh = forecastNode["TemperatureRanges"]!["Hot"]!["High"]!.GetValue<int>();
        Console.WriteLine($"Hot.High={hotHigh}");
        // output:
        //Hot.High=60

        // Get a subsection and deserialize it into a custom type.
        JsonObject temperatureRangesObject = forecastNode!["TemperatureRanges"]!.AsObject();
        using var stream = new MemoryStream();
        using var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(stream);
        temperatureRangesObject.WriteTo(writer);
        writer.Flush();
        TemperatureRanges? temperatureRanges = 
            JsonSerializer.Deserialize<TemperatureRanges>(stream.ToArray());
        Console.WriteLine($"Cold.Low={temperatureRanges!["Cold"].Low}, Hot.High={temperatureRanges["Hot"].High}");
        // output:
        //Cold.Low=-10, Hot.High=60

        // Get a subsection and deserialize it into an array.
        JsonArray datesAvailable = forecastNode!["DatesAvailable"]!.AsArray()!;
        Console.WriteLine($"DatesAvailable[0]={datesAvailable[0]}");
        // output:
        //DatesAvailable[0]=8/1/2019 12:00:00 AM
    }
}

JsonNode average grade example

The following example selects a JSON array that has integer values and calculates an average value:

using System.Text.Json.Nodes;

namespace JsonNodeAverageGradeExample;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        string jsonString =
@"{
  ""Class Name"": ""Science"",
  ""Teacher\u0027s Name"": ""Jane"",
  ""Semester"": ""2019-01-01"",
  ""Students"": [
    {
      ""Name"": ""John"",
      ""Grade"": 94.3
    },
    {
      ""Name"": ""James"",
      ""Grade"": 81.0
    },
    {
      ""Name"": ""Julia"",
      ""Grade"": 91.9
    },
    {
      ""Name"": ""Jessica"",
      ""Grade"": 72.4
    },
    {
      ""Name"": ""Johnathan""
    }
  ],
  ""Final"": true
}
";
        double sum = 0;
        int count = 0;

        JsonNode document = JsonNode.Parse(jsonString)!;

        JsonNode root = document.Root;
        JsonArray studentsArray = root["Students"]!.AsArray();

        count = studentsArray.Count;

        foreach (JsonNode? student in studentsArray)
        {
            if (student?["Grade"] is JsonNode gradeNode)
            {
                sum += (double)gradeNode;
            }
            else
            {
                sum += 70;
            }
        }

        double average = sum / count;
        Console.WriteLine($"Average grade : {average}");
    }
}
// output:
//Average grade : 81.92

The preceding code:

  • Calculates an average grade for objects in a Students array that have a Grade property.
  • Assigns a default grade of 70 for students who don't have a grade.
  • Gets the number of students from the Count property of JsonArray.

JsonNode with JsonSerializerOptions

You can use JsonSerializer to serialize and deserialize an instance of JsonNode. However, if you use an overload that takes JsonSerializerOptions, the options instance is only used to get custom converters. Other features of the options instance are not used. For example, if you set JsonSerializerOptions.DefaultIgnoreCondition to WhenWritingNull and call JsonSerializer with an overload that takes JsonSerializerOptions, null properties won't be ignored.

The same limitation applies to the JsonNode methods that take a JsonSerializerOptions parameter: WriteTo(Utf8JsonWriter, JsonSerializerOptions) and ToJsonString(JsonSerializerOptions). These APIs use JsonSerializerOptions only to get custom converters.

The following example illustrates the result of using methods that take a JsonSerializerOptions parameter and serialize a JsonNode instance:

using System.Text;
using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Nodes;
using System.Text.Json.Serialization;

namespace JsonNodeWithJsonSerializerOptions;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Person person = new Person { Name = "Nancy" };

        // Default serialization - Address property included with null token.
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy","Address":null}
        string personJsonWithNull = JsonSerializer.Serialize(person);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithNull);

        // Serialize and ignore null properties - null Address property is omitted
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy"}
        JsonSerializerOptions options = new()
        {
            DefaultIgnoreCondition = JsonIgnoreCondition.WhenWritingNull
        };
        string personJsonWithoutNull = JsonSerializer.Serialize(person, options);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithoutNull);

        // Ignore null properties doesn't work when serializing JsonNode instance
        // by using JsonSerializer.
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy","Address":null}
        var personJsonNode = JsonSerializer.Deserialize<JsonNode>(personJsonWithNull);
        personJsonWithNull = JsonSerializer.Serialize(personJsonNode, options);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithNull);

        // Ignore null properties doesn't work when serializing JsonNode instance
        // by using JsonNode.ToJsonString method.
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy","Address":null}
        personJsonWithNull = personJsonNode!.ToJsonString(options);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithNull);

        // Ignore null properties doesn't work when serializing JsonNode instance
        // by using JsonNode.WriteTo method.
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy","Address":null}
        using var stream = new MemoryStream();
        using var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(stream);
        personJsonNode!.WriteTo(writer, options);
        writer.Flush();
        personJsonWithNull = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(stream.ToArray());
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithNull);
    }
}
public class Person
{
    public string? Name { get; set; }
    public string? Address { get; set; }
}

If you need features of JsonSerializerOptions other than custom converters, use JsonSerializer with strongly typed targets (such as the Person class in this example) rather than JsonNode.

Use JsonDocument

The following example shows how to use the JsonDocument class for random access to data in a JSON string:

double sum = 0;
int count = 0;

using (JsonDocument document = JsonDocument.Parse(jsonString))
{
    JsonElement root = document.RootElement;
    JsonElement studentsElement = root.GetProperty("Students");
    foreach (JsonElement student in studentsElement.EnumerateArray())
    {
        if (student.TryGetProperty("Grade", out JsonElement gradeElement))
        {
            sum += gradeElement.GetDouble();
        }
        else
        {
            sum += 70;
        }
        count++;
    }
}

double average = sum / count;
Console.WriteLine($"Average grade : {average}");
Dim sum As Double = 0
Dim count As Integer = 0
Using document As JsonDocument = JsonDocument.Parse(jsonString)
    Dim root As JsonElement = document.RootElement
    Dim studentsElement As JsonElement = root.GetProperty("Students")
    For Each student As JsonElement In studentsElement.EnumerateArray()
        Dim gradeElement As JsonElement = Nothing
        If student.TryGetProperty("Grade", gradeElement) Then
            sum += gradeElement.GetDouble()
        Else
            sum += 70
        End If
        count += 1
    Next
End Using

Dim average As Double = sum / count
Console.WriteLine($"Average grade : {average}")

The preceding code:

  • Assumes the JSON to analyze is in a string named jsonString.
  • Calculates an average grade for objects in a Students array that have a Grade property.
  • Assigns a default grade of 70 for students who don't have a grade.
  • Creates the JsonDocument instance in a using statement because JsonDocument implements IDisposable. After a JsonDocument instance is disposed, you lose access to all of its JsonElement instances also. To retain access to a JsonElement instance, make a copy of it before the parent JsonDocument instance is disposed. To make a copy, call JsonElement.Clone. For more information, see JsonDocument is IDisposable.

The preceding example code counts students by incrementing a count variable with each iteration. An alternative is to call GetArrayLength, as shown in the following example:

double sum = 0;
int count = 0;

using (JsonDocument document = JsonDocument.Parse(jsonString))
{
    JsonElement root = document.RootElement;
    JsonElement studentsElement = root.GetProperty("Students");

    count = studentsElement.GetArrayLength();

    foreach (JsonElement student in studentsElement.EnumerateArray())
    {
        if (student.TryGetProperty("Grade", out JsonElement gradeElement))
        {
            sum += gradeElement.GetDouble();
        }
        else
        {
            sum += 70;
        }
    }
}

double average = sum / count;
Console.WriteLine($"Average grade : {average}");
Dim sum As Double = 0
Dim count As Integer = 0
Using document As JsonDocument = JsonDocument.Parse(jsonString)
    Dim root As JsonElement = document.RootElement
    Dim studentsElement As JsonElement = root.GetProperty("Students")

    count = studentsElement.GetArrayLength()

    For Each student As JsonElement In studentsElement.EnumerateArray()
        Dim gradeElement As JsonElement = Nothing
        If student.TryGetProperty("Grade", gradeElement) Then
            sum += gradeElement.GetDouble()
        Else
            sum += 70
        End If
    Next
End Using

Dim average As Double = sum / count
Console.WriteLine($"Average grade : {average}")

Here's an example of the JSON that this code processes:

{
  "Class Name": "Science",
  "Teacher\u0027s Name": "Jane",
  "Semester": "2019-01-01",
  "Students": [
    {
      "Name": "John",
      "Grade": 94.3
    },
    {
      "Name": "James",
      "Grade": 81.0
    },
    {
      "Name": "Julia",
      "Grade": 91.9
    },
    {
      "Name": "Jessica",
      "Grade": 72.4
    },
    {
      "Name": "Johnathan"
    }
  ],
  "Final": true
}

For a similar example that uses JsonNode instead of JsonDocument, see JsonNode average grade example.

How to search a JsonDocument and JsonElement for sub-elements

Searches on JsonElement require a sequential search of the properties and hence are relatively slow (for example when using TryGetProperty). System.Text.Json is designed to minimize initial parse time rather than lookup time. Therefore, use the following approaches to optimize performance when searching through a JsonDocument object:

  • Use the built-in enumerators (EnumerateArray and EnumerateObject) rather than doing your own indexing or loops.
  • Don't do a sequential search on the whole JsonDocument through every property by using RootElement. Instead, search on nested JSON objects based on the known structure of the JSON data. For example, the preceding code examples look for a Grade property in Student objects by looping through the Student objects and getting the value of Grade for each, rather than searching through all JsonElement objects looking for Grade properties. Doing the latter would result in unnecessary passes over the same data.

Use JsonDocument to write JSON

The following example shows how to write JSON from a JsonDocument:

string jsonString = File.ReadAllText(inputFileName);

var writerOptions = new JsonWriterOptions
{
    Indented = true
};

var documentOptions = new JsonDocumentOptions
{
    CommentHandling = JsonCommentHandling.Skip
};

using FileStream fs = File.Create(outputFileName);
using var writer = new Utf8JsonWriter(fs, options: writerOptions);
using JsonDocument document = JsonDocument.Parse(jsonString, documentOptions);

JsonElement root = document.RootElement;

if (root.ValueKind == JsonValueKind.Object)
{
    writer.WriteStartObject();
}
else
{
    return;
}

foreach (JsonProperty property in root.EnumerateObject())
{
    property.WriteTo(writer);
}

writer.WriteEndObject();

writer.Flush();
Dim jsonString As String = File.ReadAllText(inputFileName)

Dim writerOptions As JsonWriterOptions = New JsonWriterOptions With {
    .Indented = True
}

Dim documentOptions As JsonDocumentOptions = New JsonDocumentOptions With {
    .CommentHandling = JsonCommentHandling.Skip
}

Dim fs As FileStream = File.Create(outputFileName)
Dim writer As Utf8JsonWriter = New Utf8JsonWriter(fs, options:=writerOptions)
Dim document As JsonDocument = JsonDocument.Parse(jsonString, documentOptions)

Dim root As JsonElement = document.RootElement

If root.ValueKind = JsonValueKind.[Object] Then
    writer.WriteStartObject()
Else
    Return
End If

For Each [property] As JsonProperty In root.EnumerateObject()
    [property].WriteTo(writer)
Next

writer.WriteEndObject()

writer.Flush()

The preceding code:

  • Reads a JSON file, loads the data into a JsonDocument, and writes formatted (pretty-printed) JSON to a file.
  • Uses JsonDocumentOptions to specify that comments in the input JSON are allowed but ignored.
  • When finished, calls Flush on the writer. An alternative is to let the writer auto-flush when it's disposed.

Here's an example of JSON input to be processed by the example code:

{"Class Name": "Science","Teacher's Name": "Jane","Semester": "2019-01-01","Students": [{"Name": "John","Grade": 94.3},{"Name": "James","Grade": 81.0},{"Name": "Julia","Grade": 91.9},{"Name": "Jessica","Grade": 72.4},{"Name": "Johnathan"}],"Final": true}

The result is the following pretty-printed JSON output:

{
  "Class Name": "Science",
  "Teacher\u0027s Name": "Jane",
  "Semester": "2019-01-01",
  "Students": [
    {
      "Name": "John",
      "Grade": 94.3
    },
    {
      "Name": "James",
      "Grade": 81.0
    },
    {
      "Name": "Julia",
      "Grade": 91.9
    },
    {
      "Name": "Jessica",
      "Grade": 72.4
    },
    {
      "Name": "Johnathan"
    }
  ],
  "Final": true
}

JsonDocument is IDisposable

JsonDocument builds an in-memory view of the data into a pooled buffer. Therefore the JsonDocument type implements IDisposable and needs to be used inside a using block.

Only return a JsonDocument from your API if you want to transfer lifetime ownership and dispose responsibility to the caller. In most scenarios, that isn't necessary. If the caller needs to work with the entire JSON document, return the Clone of the RootElement, which is a JsonElement. If the caller needs to work with a particular element within the JSON document, return the Clone of that JsonElement. If you return the RootElement or a sub-element directly without making a Clone, the caller won't be able to access the returned JsonElement after the JsonDocument that owns it is disposed.

Here's an example that requires you to make a Clone:

public JsonElement LookAndLoad(JsonElement source)
{
    string json = File.ReadAllText(source.GetProperty("fileName").GetString());

    using (JsonDocument doc = JsonDocument.Parse(json))
    {
        return doc.RootElement.Clone();
    }
}

The preceding code expects a JsonElement that contains a fileName property. It opens the JSON file and creates a JsonDocument. The method assumes that the caller wants to work with the entire document, so it returns the Clone of the RootElement.

If you receive a JsonElement and are returning a sub-element, it's not necessary to return a Clone of the sub-element. The caller is responsible for keeping alive the JsonDocument that the passed-in JsonElement belongs to. For example:

public JsonElement ReturnFileName(JsonElement source)
{
   return source.GetProperty("fileName");
}

JsonDocument with JsonSerializerOptions

You can use JsonSerializer to serialize and deserialize an instance of JsonDocument. However, the implementation for reading and writing JsonDocument instances by using JsonSerializer is a wrapper over the JsonDocument.ParseValue(Utf8JsonReader) and JsonDocument.WriteTo(Utf8JsonWriter). This wrapper does not forward any JsonSerializerOptions (serializer features) to Utf8JsonReader or Utf8JsonWriter. For example, if you set JsonSerializerOptions.DefaultIgnoreCondition to WhenWritingNull and call JsonSerializer with an overload that takes JsonSerializerOptions, null properties won't be ignored.

The following example illustrates the result of using methods that take a JsonSerializerOptions parameter and serialize a JsonDocument instance:

using System.Text;
using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Nodes;
using System.Text.Json.Serialization;

namespace JsonDocumentWithJsonSerializerOptions;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Person person = new Person { Name = "Nancy" };

        // Default serialization - Address property included with null token.
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy","Address":null}
        string personJsonWithNull = JsonSerializer.Serialize(person);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithNull);

        // Serialize and ignore null properties - null Address property is omitted
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy"}
        JsonSerializerOptions options = new()
        {
            DefaultIgnoreCondition = JsonIgnoreCondition.WhenWritingNull
        };
        string personJsonWithoutNull = JsonSerializer.Serialize(person, options);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithoutNull);

        // Ignore null properties doesn't work when serializing JsonDocument instance
        // by using JsonSerializer.
        // Output: {"Name":"Nancy","Address":null}
        var personJsonDocument = JsonSerializer.Deserialize<JsonDocument>(personJsonWithNull);
        personJsonWithNull = JsonSerializer.Serialize(personJsonDocument, options);
        Console.WriteLine(personJsonWithNull);
    }
}
public class Person
{
    public string? Name { get; set; }

    public string? Address { get; set; }
}

If you need features of JsonSerializerOptions, use JsonSerializer with strongly typed targets (such as the Person class in this example) rather than JsonDocument.

See also