Quickstart: Build and deploy apps to Azure Spring Apps

Note

Azure Spring Apps is the new name for the Azure Spring Cloud service. Although the service has a new name, you'll see the old name in some places for a while as we work to update assets such as screenshots, videos, and diagrams.

This article applies to: ✔️ Basic/Standard tier ❌ Enterprise tier

This quickstart explains how to build and deploy Spring applications to Azure Spring Apps using the Azure CLI.

Prerequisites

Download the sample app

Use the following steps to download the sample app. If you've been using the Azure Cloud Shell, switch to a local command prompt.

  1. Create a new folder and clone the sample app repository.

    mkdir source-code
    
    cd source-code
    
    git clone https://github.com/Azure-Samples/Azure-Spring-Cloud-Samples
    
  2. Navigate to the repository directory.

    cd Azure-Spring-Cloud-Samples
    

Deploy PlanetWeatherProvider

Use the following steps to deploy the PlanetWeatherProvider project.

  1. Create an app for the PlanetWeatherProvider project in your Azure Spring Apps instance.

    az spring app create --name planet-weather-provider --runtime-version NetCore_31
    

    To enable automatic service registration, you have given the app the same name as the value of spring.application.name in the project's appsettings.json file:

    "spring": {
      "application": {
        "name": "planet-weather-provider"
      }
    }
    

    This command may take several minutes to run.

  2. Change directory to the PlanetWeatherProvider project folder.

    cd steeltoe-sample/src/planet-weather-provider
    
  3. Create the binaries and the .zip file to be deployed.

    dotnet publish -c release -o ./publish
    

    Tip

    The project file contains the following XML to package the binaries in a .zip file after writing them to the ./publish folder:

    <Target Name="Publish-Zip" AfterTargets="Publish">
      <ZipDirectory SourceDirectory="$(PublishDir)" DestinationFile="$(MSBuildProjectDirectory)/publish-deploy-planet.zip" Overwrite="true" />
    </Target>
    
  4. Deploy the project to Azure.

    Make sure that the command prompt is in the project folder before running the following command.

    az spring app deploy -n planet-weather-provider --runtime-version NetCore_31 --main-entry Microsoft.Azure.SpringCloud.Sample.PlanetWeatherProvider.dll --artifact-path ./publish-deploy-planet.zip
    

    The --main-entry option specifies the relative path from the .zip file's root folder to the .dll file that contains the application's entry point. After the service uploads the .zip file, it extracts all the files and folders, and then tries to execute the entry point in the specified .dll file.

    This command may take several minutes to run.

Deploy SolarSystemWeather

Use the following steps to deploy the SolarSystemWeather project.

  1. Create another app in your Azure Spring Apps instance for the project.

    az spring app create --name solar-system-weather --runtime-version NetCore_31
    

    solar-system-weather is the name that is specified in the SolarSystemWeather project's appsettings.json file.

    This command may take several minutes to run.

  2. Change directory to the SolarSystemWeather project.

    cd ../solar-system-weather
    
  3. Create the binaries and .zip file to be deployed.

    dotnet publish -c release -o ./publish
    
  4. Deploy the project to Azure.

    az spring app deploy -n solar-system-weather --runtime-version NetCore_31 --main-entry Microsoft.Azure.SpringCloud.Sample.SolarSystemWeather.dll --artifact-path ./publish-deploy-solar.zip
    

    This command may take several minutes to run.

Assign public endpoint

Before testing the application, get a public endpoint for an HTTP GET request to the solar-system-weather application.

  1. Run the following command to assign the endpoint.

    az spring app update -n solar-system-weather --assign-endpoint true
    
  2. Run the following command to get the URL of the endpoint.

    Windows:

    az spring app show -n solar-system-weather -o table
    

    Linux:

    az spring app show --name solar-system-weather | grep url
    

Test the application

To test the application, send a GET request to the solar-system-weather app. In a browser, navigate to the public URL with /weatherforecast appended to it. For example: https://servicename-solar-system-weather.azuremicroservices.io/weatherforecast

The output is JSON:

[{"Key":"Mercury","Value":"very warm"},{"Key":"Venus","Value":"quite unpleasant"},{"Key":"Mars","Value":"very cool"},{"Key":"Saturn","Value":"a little bit sandy"}]

This response shows that both Spring apps are working. The SolarSystemWeather app returns data that it retrieved from the PlanetWeatherProvider app.

This article explains how to build and deploy Spring applications to Azure Spring Apps. You can use Azure CLI, the Maven plugin, or Intellij. This article describes each alternative.

Prerequisites

Build the Spring applications locally

Use the following commands to clone the sample repository, navigate to the sample folder, and then build the project.

git clone https://github.com/azure-samples/spring-petclinic-microservices
cd spring-petclinic-microservices
mvn clean package -DskipTests -Denv=cloud

Compiling the project takes 5-10 minutes. When the project is compiled, you should have individual JAR files for each service in their respective folders.

Create and deploy apps on Azure Spring Apps

Use the following steps to create and deploys apps on Azure Spring Apps using the CLI.

  1. If you didn't run the following commands in the previous quickstarts, run them now to set the CLI defaults.

    az configure --defaults group=<resource-group-name> spring=<service-name>
    
  2. Create the two core Spring applications for PetClinic: API gateway and customers-service.

    az spring app create --name api-gateway --instance-count 1 --memory 2Gi --assign-endpoint
    az spring app create --name customers-service --instance-count 1 --memory 2Gi
    
  3. Deploy the JAR files built in the previous step.

    az spring app deploy \
        --name api-gateway \
        --artifact-path spring-petclinic-api-gateway/target/spring-petclinic-api-gateway-2.5.1.jar \
        --jvm-options="-Xms2048m -Xmx2048m"
    az spring app deploy \
        --name customers-service \
        --artifact-path spring-petclinic-customers-service/target/spring-petclinic-customers-service-2.5.1.jar \
        --jvm-options="-Xms2048m -Xmx2048m"
    
  4. Query the app status after deployments with the following command.

    az spring app list --output table
    

    This command produces output similar to the following example:

    Name               Location    ResourceGroup    Production Deployment    Public Url                                           Provisioning Status    CPU    Memory    Running Instance    Registered Instance    Persistent Storage
    -----------------  ----------  ---------------  -----------------------  ---------------------------------------------------  ---------------------  -----  --------  ------------------  ---------------------  --------------------
    api-gateway        eastus      xxxxxx-sp         default                  https://<service name>-api-gateway.azuremicroservices.io   Succeeded              1      2         1/1                 1/1                    -
    customers-service  eastus      <service name>         default                                                                       Succeeded              1      2         1/1                 1/1                    -
    

Verify the services

Access the app gateway and customers service from browser with the Public Url shown above, in the format of https://<service name>-api-gateway.azuremicroservices.io.

Screenshot of the PetClinic customers service.

Tip

To troubleshot deployments, you can use the following command to get logs streaming in real time whenever the app is running az spring app logs --name <app name> -f.

Deploy extra apps

To get the PetClinic app functioning with all features like Admin Server, Visits, and Veterinarians, deploy the other apps with following commands:

az spring app create --name admin-server --instance-count 1 --memory 2Gi --assign-endpoint
az spring app create --name vets-service --instance-count 1 --memory 2Gi
az spring app create --name visits-service --instance-count 1 --memory 2Gi
az spring app deploy --name admin-server --jar-path spring-petclinic-admin-server/target/spring-petclinic-admin-server-2.5.1.jar --jvm-options="-Xms2048m -Xmx2048m"
az spring app deploy --name vets-service --jar-path spring-petclinic-vets-service/target/spring-petclinic-vets-service-2.5.1.jar --jvm-options="-Xms2048m -Xmx2048m"
az spring app deploy --name visits-service --jar-path spring-petclinic-visits-service/target/spring-petclinic-visits-service-2.5.1.jar --jvm-options="-Xms2048m -Xmx2048m"

Clean up resources

If you plan to continue working with subsequent quickstarts and tutorials, you might want to leave these resources in place. When no longer needed, delete the resource group, which deletes the resources in the resource group. To delete the resource group by using Azure CLI, use the following commands:

echo "Enter the Resource Group name:" &&
read resourceGroupName &&
az group delete --name $resourceGroupName &&
echo "Press [ENTER] to continue ..."

Next steps