Create a personal tab

Personal tabs, along with personally scoped bots, are part of personal apps and are scoped to a single user. They can be pinned to the left pane for easy access.

Important

  • To learn how to create a tab with Teams Toolkit, see build your first tab app using JavaScript.
  • We've introduced the Teams Toolkit Overview extension within Visual Studio Code. This version comes to you with many new app development features. We recommend that you use Teams Toolkit v5 for building your Teams app.

Ensure that you've all the prerequisites to build your personal tab.

Note

This topic reflects version 2.0.x of the Microsoft Teams JavaScript client library (TeamsJS). If you are using an earlier version, refer to the TeamsJS library overview for guidance on the differences between the latest TeamsJS and earlier versions.

Create a personal tab with Node.js

  1. At the command prompt, install the Yeoman and gulp-cli packages by entering the following command after installing the Node.js:

    npm install yo gulp-cli --global
    
  2. At the command prompt, install Microsoft Teams app generator by entering the following command:

    npm install generator-teams --global
    

Following are the steps to create a personal tab:

  1. Generate your application with a personal tab
  2. Add a content page to the personal tab
  3. Create your app package
  4. Build and run your application
  5. Establish a secure tunnel to your personal tab
  6. Upload your application to Teams

Generate your application with a personal tab

  1. At the command prompt, create a new directory for your personal tab.

  2. Enter the following command in your new directory to start the Microsoft Teams app generator:

    yo teams
    
  3. Provide your values to a series of questions prompted by Microsoft Teams app generator to update your manifest.json file.

    Teams generator

    Series of questions to update your manifest.json file
    • What is your solution name?

      The solution name is your project name. You can accept the suggested name by selecting Enter.

    • Where do you want to place the files?

      You're currently in your project directory. Select Enter.

    • Title of your Microsoft Teams app project?

      The title is your app package name and is used in the app manifest and description. Enter a title or select Enter to accept the default name.

    • Your (company) name? (max 32 characters)

      Your company name will be used in the app manifest. Enter a company name or select Enter to accept the default name.

    • Which manifest version would you like to use?

      Select the default schema.

    • Quick scaffolding? (Y/n)

      The default is yes; enter n to enter your Microsoft Partner ID.

    • Enter your Microsoft Partner Id, if you've one? (Leave blank to skip)

      This field isn't required and must be used only if you're already part of the Microsoft Partner Network.

    • What do you want to add to your project?

      Select ( * ) A Tab.

    • The URL where you will host this solution?

      By default, the generator suggests an Azure website URL. You're only testing your app locally, so a valid URL isn't necessary.

    • Would you like show a loading indicator when your app/tab loads?

      Choose not to include a loading indicator when your app or tab loads. The default is no, enter n.

    • Would you like personal apps to be rendered without a tab header-bar?

      Choose not to include personal apps to be rendered without a tab header-bar. Default is no, enter n.

    • Would you like to include Test framework and initial tests? (y/N)

      Choose not to include a test framework for this project. The default is no, enter n.

    • Would you like to include ESLint support? (y/N)

      Choose not to include ESLint support. The default is no, enter n.

    • Would you like to use Azure Applications Insights for telemetry? (y/N)

      Choose not to include Azure Application Insights. The default is no; enter n.

    • Default Tab Name (max 16 characters)?

      Name your tab. This tab name is used throughout your project as a file or URL path component.

    • What kind of Tab would you like to create?

      Use the arrow keys to select Personal (static).

    • Do you require Microsoft Entra Single-Sign-On support for the tab?

      Choose not to include Microsoft Entra Single-Sign-On support for the tab. The default is yes, enter n.

    Note

    In a tab, the tab home page appears only when the user selects the back button (or moves out of the tab) and comes back to the home page. The tab doesn't maintain or retain the previous state by design.

Add a content page to the personal tab

Create a content page and update the existing files of the personal tab application:

  1. Create a new personal.html file in your Visual Studio Code with the following markup:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
        <head>
            <meta charset="UTF-8">
            <title>
                <!-- Todo: add your a title here -->
            </title>
            <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
            <!-- inject:css -->
            <!-- endinject -->
        </head>
            <body>
                <h1>Personal Tab</h1>
                <p><img src="/assets/icon.png"></p>
                <p>This is your personal tab!</p>
            </body>
    </html>
    
  2. Save personal.html in your application's public folder in the following location:

    ./src/public/<yourDefaultTabNameTab>/personal.html
    
  3. Open manifest.json from the following location in your Visual Studio Code:

     ./src/manifest/manifest.json
    
  4. Add the following to the empty staticTabs array (staticTabs":[]) and add the following JSON object:

    {
        "entityId": "personalTab",
        "name": "Personal Tab ",
        "contentUrl": "https://{{PUBLIC_HOSTNAME}}/<yourDefaultTabNameTab>/personal.html",
        "websiteUrl": "https://{{PUBLIC_HOSTNAME}}",
        "scopes": ["personal"]
    }
    

    Important

    The path component yourDefaultTabNameTab is the value that you entered in the generator for Default Tab Name plus the word Tab.

    For example: DefaultTabName is MyTab then /MyTabTab/

  5. Update the contentURL path component yourDefaultTabNameTab with your actual tab name.

  6. Save the updated manifest.json file.

  7. Open Tab.ts in your Visual Studio Code from the following path to provide your content page in an iFrame:

    ./src/server/<yourDefaultTabNameTab>/<yourDefaultTabNameTab>.ts
    
  8. Add the following to the list of iFrame decorators:

     @PreventIframe("/<yourDefaultTabName Tab>/personal.html")
    
  9. Save the updated file. Your tab code is complete.

Create your app package

You must have an app package to build and run your application in Teams. The app package is created through a gulp task that validates the manifest.json file and generates the zip folder in the ./package directory. At the command prompt, use the command gulp manifest.

Build and run your application

Build your application

Enter the following command at the command prompt to transpile your solution into the ./dist folder:

gulp build

Run your application

  1. At the command prompt, enter the following command to start a local web server:

    gulp serve
    
  2. Enter http://localhost:3007/<yourDefaultAppNameTab>/ in your browser to view your application's home page.

    Default Tab

  3. Browse http://localhost:3007/<yourDefaultAppNameTab>/personal.html, to view your personal tab.

    Default html Tab

Establish a secure tunnel to your tab

At the command prompt exit the localhost and enter the following command to establish a secure tunnel to your tab:

gulp ngrok-serve

After your tab is uploaded to Microsoft Teams through ngrok and successfully saved, you can view it in Teams until your tunnel session ends.

Upload your application to Teams

  1. Go to Teams and select Apps  Microsoft Teams Store .

  2. Select Manage your apps > Upload an app > Upload a custom app.

  3. Go to your project directory, browse to the ./package folder, select the zip folder, and choose Open.

    Adding your personal tab

  4. Select Add in the dialog. Your tab is uploaded to Teams.

    Personal tab uploaded

  5. In the left pane of Teams, select ellipses ●●● and then choose your uploaded app to view your personal tab.

    Now you've successfully created and added your personal tab in Teams.

    As you've your personal tab in Teams, you can also reorder your personal tab.

Create a personal tab with ASP.NET Core

  1. At the command prompt, create a new directory for your tab project.

  2. Clone the sample repository into your new directory using the following command or you can download the source code and extract the files:

    git clone https://github.com/OfficeDev/Microsoft-Teams-Samples.git
    

Following are the steps to create a personal tab:

  1. Generate your application with a personal tab
  2. Update and run your application
  3. Establish a secure tunnel to your tab
  4. Update your app package with Developer Portal
  5. Preview your app in Teams

Generate your application with a personal tab

  1. Open Visual Studio and select Open a project or solution.

  2. Go to Microsoft-Teams-Samples > samples > tab-personal > razor-csharp folder and open PersonalTab.sln.

  3. In Visual Studio, select F5 or choose Start Debugging from your application's Debug menu to verify if the application has loaded properly. In a browser, go to the following URLs:

    • <http://localhost:3978/>
    • <http://localhost:3978/personalTab>
    • <http://localhost:3978/privacy>
    • <http://localhost:3978/tou>
Review the source code

Startup.cs

This project was created from an ASP.NET Core 3.1 web application empty template with the Advanced - Configure for HTTPS check box selected at setup. The MVC services are registered by the dependency injection framework's ConfigureServices() method. Additionally, the empty template doesn't enable serving static content by default, so the static files middleware is added to the Configure() method using the following code:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
  {
      services.AddMvc().SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_2);
  }
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
  {
    app.UseStaticFiles();
    app.UseMvc();
  }

wwwroot folder

In ASP.NET Core, the web root folder is where the application looks for static files.

Index.cshtml

ASP.NET Core treats files called Index as the default or home page for the site. When your browser URL points to the root of the site, Index.cshtml is displayed as the home page for your application.

AppManifest folder

This folder contains the following required app package files:

  • A full color icon measuring 192 x 192 pixels.
  • A transparent outline icon measuring 32 x 32 pixels.
  • A manifest.json file that specifies the attributes of your app.

These files must be zipped in an app package for use in uploading your tab to Teams. Teams loads the contentUrl specified in your manifest, embeds it in an <iframe>, and renders it in your tab.

.csproj

In Visual Studio Solution Explorer, right-click on the project and select Edit Project File. At the end of the file, you can see the following code that creates and updates your zip folder when the application builds:

<PropertyGroup>
    <PostBuildEvent>powershell.exe Compress-Archive -Path \"$(ProjectDir)AppManifest\*\" -DestinationPath \"$(TargetDir)tab.zip\" -Force</PostBuildEvent>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <EmbeddedResource Include="AppManifest\icon-outline.png">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </EmbeddedResource>
    <EmbeddedResource Include="AppManifest\icon-color.png">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </EmbeddedResource>
    <EmbeddedResource Include="AppManifest\manifest.json">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </EmbeddedResource>
  </ItemGroup>

Update and run your application

  1. Open Visual Studio Solution Explorer and go to Pages > Shared folder and open _Layout.cshtml and add the following to the <head> tags section:

    <script src="https://ajax.aspnetcdn.com/ajax/jQuery/jquery-3.4.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://res.cdn.office.net/teams-js/2.0.0/js/MicrosoftTeams.min.js" integrity="sha384-QtTBFeFlfRDZBfwHJHYQp7MdLJ2C3sfAEB1Qpy+YblvjavBye+q87TELpTnvlXw4" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
    
  2. In Visual Studio Solution Explorer, open PersonalTab.cshtml from Pages folder and add microsoftTeams.app.initialize() in the <script> tags.

  3. Select Save.

  4. In Visual Studio, select F5 or choose Start Debugging from your application's Debug menu.

Establish a secure tunnel to your tab

At the command prompt in the root of your project directory, run the following command to establish a secure tunnel to your tab:

ngrok http 3978 --host-header=localhost

Update your app package with Developer Portal

  1. Go to Developer portal.

  2. Open Apps and select Import app.

  3. The app package file name is tab.zip and it's available at /bin/Debug/netcoreapp3.1/tab.zip path.

  4. Select tab.zip and open it in the Developer Portal.

  5. A default App ID is created and populated in Basic information section.

  6. Add the Short and Long description for your app in Descriptions.

  7. In Developer Information, add the required details and in Website (must be a valid HTTPS URL) give your ngrok HTTPS URL.

  8. In App URLs, update the Privacy policy to https://<yourngrokurl>/privacy and Terms of use to https://<yourngrokurl>/tou and select Save.

  9. In App features, select Personal app > Create your first personal app tab and enter the name and update the Content URL with https://<yourngrokurl>/personalTab. Leave the Website URL field blank and select Context as personalTab from the dropdown list and select Confirm.

  10. Select Save.

  11. In the Domains section, domains from your tabs must contain your ngrok URL without the HTTPS prefix <yourngrokurl>.ngrok.io.

Preview your app in Teams

  1. Select Preview in Teams from the Developer Portal toolbar, Developer Portal informs you that your custom app is uploaded successfully. The Add page appears for your app in Teams.

  2. Select Add to load the tab in Teams. Your tab is now available in Teams.

    Default Tab

    Now you've successfully created and added your personal tab in Teams.

    As you've your personal tab in Teams, you can also reorder your personal tab.

Create a personal tab with ASP.NET Core MVC

  1. At the command prompt, create a new directory for your tab project.

  2. Clone the sample repository into your new directory using the following command or you can download the source code and extract the files:

    git clone https://github.com/OfficeDev/Microsoft-Teams-Samples.git
    

Following are the steps to create a personal tab:

  1. Generate your application with a personal tab
  2. Update and run application
  3. Establish a secure tunnel to your tab
  4. Update your app package with Developer Portal
  5. Preview your app in Teams

Generate your application with a personal tab

  1. Open Visual Studio and select Open a project or solution.

  2. Go to Microsoft-Teams-Samples > samples > tab-personal > mvc-csharp folder and open PersonalTabMVC.sln in Visual Studio.

  3. In Visual Studio, select F5 or choose Start Debugging from your application's Debug menu to verify if the application has loaded properly. In a browser, go to the following URLs:

    • <http://localhost:3978>
    • <http://localhost:3978/personalTab>
    • <http://localhost:3978/privacy>
    • <http://localhost:3978/tou>
Review the source code

Startup.cs

This project was created from an ASP.NET Core 3.1 web application empty template with the Advanced - Configure for HTTPS check box selected at setup. The MVC services are registered by the dependency injection framework's ConfigureServices() method. Additionally, the empty template doesn't enable serving static content by default, so the static files middleware is added to the Configure() method using the following code:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
  {
    services.AddMvc().SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_2);
  }
public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
  {
    app.UseStaticFiles();
    app.UseMvc();
  }

wwwroot folder

In ASP.NET Core, the web root folder is where the application looks for static files.

AppManifest folder

This folder contains the following required app package files:

  • A full color icon measuring 192 x 192 pixels.
  • A transparent outline icon measuring 32 x 32 pixels.
  • A manifest.json file that specifies the attributes of your app.

These files must be zipped in an app package for use in uploading your tab to Teams. Teams loads the contentUrl specified in your manifest, embeds it in an iFrame, and renders it in your tab.

.csproj

In the Visual Studio Solution Explorer, right-click on the project and select Edit Project File. At the end of the file, you see the following code that creates and updates your zip folder when the application builds:

<PropertyGroup>
    <PostBuildEvent>powershell.exe Compress-Archive -Path \"$(ProjectDir)AppManifest\*\" -DestinationPath \"$(TargetDir)tab.zip\" -Force</PostBuildEvent>
  </PropertyGroup>

  <ItemGroup>
    <EmbeddedResource Include="AppManifest\icon-outline.png">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </EmbeddedResource>
    <EmbeddedResource Include="AppManifest\icon-color.png">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </EmbeddedResource>
    <EmbeddedResource Include="AppManifest\manifest.json">
      <CopyToOutputDirectory>Always</CopyToOutputDirectory>
    </EmbeddedResource>
  </ItemGroup>

Models

PersonalTab.cs presents a message object and methods that are called from PersonalTabController when a user selects a button in the PersonalTab View.

Views

These views are the different views in ASP.NET Core MVC:

  • Home: ASP.NET Core treats files called Index as the default or home page for the site. When your browser URL points to the root of the site, Index.cshtml is displayed as the home page for your application.

  • Shared: The partial view markup _Layout.cshtml contains the application's overall page structure and shared visual elements. It also references the Teams Library.

Controllers

The controllers use the ViewBag property to transfer values dynamically to the Views.

Update and run your application

  1. Open Visual Studio Solution Explorer and go to Views > Shared folder and open _Layout.cshtml, and add the following to the <head> tags section:

    <script src="https://ajax.aspnetcdn.com/ajax/jQuery/jquery-3.4.1.min.js"></script>
    <script src="https://res.cdn.office.net/teams-js/2.0.0/js/MicrosoftTeams.min.js" integrity="sha384-QtTBFeFlfRDZBfwHJHYQp7MdLJ2C3sfAEB1Qpy+YblvjavBye+q87TELpTnvlXw4" crossorigin="anonymous"></script>
    
  2. In Visual Studio Solution Explorer, open PersonalTab.cshtml from Views > PersonalTab folder and add microsoftTeams.app.initialize() inside the <script> tags.

  3. Select Save.

  4. In Visual Studio, select F5 or choose Start Debugging from your application's Debug menu.

Establish a secure tunnel to your tab

At the command prompt in the root of your project directory, run the following command to establish a secure tunnel to your tab:

ngrok http 3978 --host-header=localhost

Update your app package with Developer Portal

  1. Go to Developer portal.

  2. Open Apps and select Import app.

  3. The name of your app package is tab.zip. It's available in the following path:

    /bin/Debug/netcoreapp3.1/tab.zip
    
  4. Select tab.zip and open it in the Developer Portal.

  5. A default App ID is created and populated in Basic information section.

  6. Add the Short and Long description for your app in Descriptions.

  7. In Developer information, add the required details and in Website (must be a valid HTTPS URL) give your ngrok HTTPS URL.

  8. In App URLs, update the Privacy policy to https://<yourngrokurl>/privacy and Terms of use to https://<yourngrokurl>/tou and select Save.

  9. In App features, select Personal app > Create your first personal app tab and enter the name and update the Content URL with https://<yourngrokurl>/personalTab. Leave the Website URL field blank and select Context as personalTab from the dropdown list and select Confirm.

  10. Select Save.

  11. In the Domains section, Domains from your tabs must contain your ngrok URL without the HTTPS prefix <yourngrokurl>.ngrok.io.

Preview your app in Teams

  1. Select Preview in Teams from the Developer Portal toolbar, Developer Portal informs you that your custom app is uploaded successfully. The Add page appears for your app in Teams.

  2. Select Add to load the tab on Teams. Your tab is now available in Teams.

    Personal tab

    Now you've successfully created and added your personal tab in Teams.

    As you've your personal tab in Teams, you can also reorder your personal tab.

Blazor lets you build interactive web UIs using C#, instead of JavaScript. You can create a tab app and a bot app with Blazor and the latest version of Visual Studio.

Screenshot of the blazor app displaying the tab, Bot, and Message Extension output after you've successfully completed the step-by-step blazor guide.

Note

Teams Toolkit doesn't support the message extension capability.

Here's a list of tools you require for building and deploying your app.

  Install For using...
Required    
  Visual Studio version 17.2.0 preview 2.1 Select Visual Studio Enterprise 2022 Preview (version 17.2.0 preview 2.1).
  Microsoft Teams Microsoft Teams to collaborate with everyone you work with through apps for chat, meetings, and call-all in one place.
  Microsoft Edge (recommended) or Google Chrome A browser with developer tools.

Prepare development environment

After you've installed the required tools, set up the development environment.

Install Microsoft Teams Toolkit

The Teams Toolkit helps simplify the development process with tools to provision and deploy cloud resources for your app, publish to the Teams Store, and more. You can use the toolkit with Visual Studio, or as a Command Line Interface (called teamsfx).

You can use the latest version of the Visual Studio to develop Teams apps with Blazor Server in .NET.

To install the Microsoft Teams Toolkit extension:

  1. Download the latest version of the Visual Studio.

  2. Open vs_enterprise__3bed52501a604464b1eff2ce580fd4eb.exe from your download folder.

  3. Select Continue in the Visual Studio Installer page to configure your installation.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio Installer with continue options highlighted in red.

  4. Select ASP.NET and web development under Workloads.

  5. Select Microsoft Teams development tools under Installation details.

  6. Select Install.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio Enterprise Preview with the option Asp.NET, web development, and Microsoft Teams development tools under installation details and install highlighted in red.

    Your Visual Studio is installed in a few minutes.

Set up your Teams development tenant

A tenant is like a space or a container for your organization in Teams, where you chat, share files, and run meetings. This space is also where you upload and test your custom app. Let's verify if you're ready to develop with the tenant.

Enable custom app upload option

After creating the app, you must load your app in Teams without distributing it. This process is known as custom app upload. Sign in to your Microsoft 365 account to view this option.

Do you already have a tenant and the admin access? Let's check if you really do!

Verify if you can upload a custom app in Teams:

  1. In the Teams client, select Apps.

  2. Select Manage your apps.

  3. Select Upload a custom app. If you see Upload a custom app option, custom app upload is enabled.

    Screenshot shows the option to upload a custom app in Teams.

    Note

    Contact your Teams administrator, if you don't find the option to upload a custom app.

Create a free Teams developer tenant (optional)

If you don't have a Teams developer account, you can get it for free. Join the Microsoft 365 developer program!

  1. Go to the Microsoft 365 developer program.

  2. Select Join Now and follow the onscreen instructions.

  3. In the welcome screen, select Set up E5 subscription.

  4. Set up your administrator account. After you finish, the following screen appears.

    Screenshot of Microsoft 365 Developer Program displaying your Microsoft 365 developer subscriptions for the blazor app.

  5. Sign in to Teams using the administrator account you just set up. Verify that you've the Upload a custom app option in Teams.

Get a free Azure account

If you wish to host your app or access resources in Azure, you must have an Azure subscription. Create a free account before you begin.

Now you've got all the tools and set up your accounts. Next, let's set up your development environment and start building!

Create project workspace for your tab app

Start Teams app development by creating your first app. This app uses tab capability.

Screenshot of Blazor app displaying the final output of tab app after you've successfully completed the step-by-step guide.

This tutorial walks you through the steps to create, run, and deploy your first Teams app using .NET/Blazor.

In this page, you'll learn:

  1. How to set up a new tab project with Teams Toolkit
  2. About the directory structure of your app

Create your tab project

Use Teams Toolkit to create your first tab project. The toolkit takes you through a series of pages to create and configure your Teams app project:

  1. Create a new project page: You can select the project type.
  2. Configure your new project page: You can enter the project details.
  3. Create a new Teams application page: You can select the Teams app capabilities.

To create your tab project workspace

  1. Open the latest version of Visual Studio.

  2. Select Create a new project.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio with Create a new project option highlighted in red for blazor app.

    The Create a new project page appears.

  3. Select the project details.

    Select the project type:

    1. Search for Microsoft Teams from templates dropdown list.

    2. Select Microsoft Teams App as the template.

    3. Select Next.

      Screenshot of Create a new project with Next option highlighted in red for blazor app creation.

      The Configure your new project page appears.

  4. Configure the new project details.

    Select the following project configuration:

    1. Enter a suitable name for your project.

      Note

      You can note that the project name you enter is automatically filled in as the Solution name also. If you want, you can change the solution name with no affect on project name.

    2. Select the folder path where you want to create the project workspace.

    3. Enter a different solution name, if you want.

    4. Check the option to save the project and solution in the same folder, if you want. For this tutorial, you don't need this option.

    5. Select Create.

      Screenshot of Configure your new project with Create option highlighted in red.

      The Create a new Teams application page appears.

  5. Select Teams app feature.

    1. Select the Tab as the capability for your app.

    2. Select Create.

    Screenshot of Create a new Teams application with Tab and Create options highlighted in red.

    Your Teams tab app is created in few seconds.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio displaying tips to get started while building your app.

    A quick recap of creating a Teams tab app. Watch this short recap for creating a Teams tab app.

    Graphical representation shows the process of creating the Teams tab app1.

Take a tour of the source code for Teams tab app

After project creation, you've the components to build a basic personal app. You can view the project directory structure in the Solution Explorer pane of the Visual Studio.

Screenshot of Solution explorer displaying the components to build a basic personal app.

Teams Toolkit creates a scaffolding for your project based on the capabilities you selected. Among other files, Teams Toolkit maintains:

Folder name Contents
App icons The app icons are stored as PNG files in color.png and outline.png.
manifest.json The app manifest for publishing through the Developer Portal for Teams is stored in Properties/manifest.json.
BackendController.cs A backend controller is provided in Controllers/BackendController.cs for assisting with authentication.
Pages/Tab.razor The app manifest for publishing through the Developer Portal for Teams is stored in Properties/manifest.json.
TeamsFx.cs and JS/src/index.js The content is used for initializing communications with the Teams host.

You can add backend functionality by adding other ASP.NET Core controllers to your application.

Build and run your first Teams tab app

After you set up your project workspace with Teams Toolkit, build your tab project.

To build and run your app:

  1. Select Project > Teams Toolkit > Prepare Teams App Dependencies.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio with Project, Teams Toolkit, and Prepare Teams App Dependencies options are highlighted in red.

  2. Select your Microsoft 365 account or Add an account to sign in.

    Screenshot of Microsoft 365 Account with Continue option highlighted in red.

  3. Select Debug > Start Debugging or select F5 to run your app in debug mode.

    Learn what happens when you run your app locally in the debugger.

    When you select F5, Teams Toolkit:

    1. Registers your application with Microsoft Entra ID.
    2. Registers your application for uploading in Teams.
    3. Starts your application backend running locally.
    4. Starts your application front-end hosted locally.
    5. Starts Teams in a web browser with a command to instruct Teams to upload a custom app (the URL is registered inside the application manifest).
  4. Install the self-signed SSL certificate for local debugging, if requested.

    Screenshot of Security Warning with Yes option highlighted in red.

    Teams is loaded in a web browser.

  5. Select Add when prompted to install the app to Teams.

    Screenshot of BlazorApp local debug with Add option highlighted in red.

    Congratulations, your first tab app is running in your local environment!

    Screenshot shows your first tab app is running in your local environment.

  6. Move through the page to view the user details.

  7. Select Authorize to let your app retrieve user details using Microsoft Graph.

    The app requests permission to grant access for displaying user details.

    Screenshot shows the authorize option in the personal tab of your app.

  8. Select Accept to let your app access user details.

    Screenshot of Permissions requested displaying the App info.

    Your photograph and details appear in your Personal Tab.

    Screenshot shows the basic information displayed on the personal tab of your app in Teams.

    You can do normal debugging activities, such as setting breakpoints, as if it were any other web application. The app supports hot reloading. If you change any file within the project, the page will be reloaded.

    Learn how to troubleshoot if your app doesn't run locally.

    To run your app in Teams, you need a Microsoft 365 development account that allows custom app upload. You can learn more about it in the Prerequisites section.

  9. Stop debugging in Visual Studio.

Preview your first Teams tab app

You've learned to create, build, and run Teams app with tab capability. The following final steps are to deploy your app on Azure and preview in Teams follow the steps:

  1. Provision your tab app in the cloud: You can provision your tab app in the cloud.

  2. Deploy your tab app to cloud: You can deploy your tab app to cloud.

  3. Preview your tab app in Teams: You can preview your tab app in Teams.

    Let's deploy the first app with tab capability on Azure using Teams Toolkit.

To provision your tab app in the cloud

  1. Select Project > Teams Toolkit > Provision in the Cloud.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio with Project, Teams Toolkit, and Provision in the Cloud options are highlighted in red.

  2. Enter the subscription and resource group details in the Provision dialog:

    1. Select the subscription name from Subscription name dropdown list.
    2. Select the resource group from Resource group dropdown list or select New to add the resource group generated for your app.
    3. Select your Region, if new resource group is created.
    4. Select Provision.

    Screenshot of Provision with New and Provision highlighted in red.

    Provision warning displays.

  3. Select Provision.

    Screenshot of Teams Toolkit with Provision highlighted in red.

    It takes a few minutes for your resource group to provision in the cloud.

  4. After the provision is complete, select OK.

    Screenshot of Teams Toolkit app with OK option highlighted in red.

  5. Select View Provisioned Resources to view on Azure portal.

    Screenshot of Teams Toolkit with View Provisioned Resources highlighted in red.

  6. Sign in to your Azure portal account on sign-in prompt.

    Your app-dev-rg appears.

    Screenshot of Blazorapp-dev-rg displaying the Resources provisioned in the Azure portal.

    Your resources are provisioned in the Azure portal!

To deploy your tab app to cloud

  1. Select Project > Teams Toolkit > Deploy to the Cloud.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio with Project, Teams Toolkit, and Deploy to the Cloud options highlighted in red.

  2. Select OK.

    Screenshot of app built with Teams Toolkit with OK option highlighted in red.

    Your tab app is successfully deployed to the cloud!

To preview your tab app in Teams

  1. Select Project > Teams Toolkit > Preview in Teams.

    Screenshot of Visual Studio with Project, Teams Toolkit, and Preview in Teams options are highlighted in red.

  2. Select Add when prompted to install the app to Teams.

    Screenshot of Teams displaying the Add option for adding Blazor app. The Add option highlighted in red.

    Congratulations, your first tab app is running in your Azure environment!

    Screenshot shows the personal tab of your app in Teams.

    Move through the page to view the user details.

  3. Select Authorize to let your app retrieve user details using Microsoft Graph.

    The app requests permission to grant access for displaying user details.

    Screenshot shows the authorize option in the personal tab of your app in Teams.

  4. Select Accept to let your app access user details.

    Screenshot of Permissions requested displaying the App info.

    Your photograph and details appear in your Personal Tab.

    Screenshot of your app with personal tab displaying basic information.

Congratulations

You've completed the tutorial to build a tab app with Blazor.

Reorder static personal tabs

Starting with manifest version 1.7, developers can rearrange all tabs in their personal app. You can move the bot chat tab, which always defaults to the first position, anywhere in the personal app tab header. Two reserved tab entityId keywords are declared, conversations and about.

If you create a bot with a personal scope, it appears in the first tab position in a personal app by default. If you want to move it to another position, you must add a static tab object to your manifest with the reserved keyword, conversations. The conversation tab appears on web or desktop depending on where you add the conversation tab in the staticTabs array.


{
   "staticTabs":[
      {
         
      },
      {
         "entityId":"conversations",
         "scopes":[
            "personal"
         ]
      }
   ]
}

Extend static tabs to group chat and meetings

Note

  • Extend your static tabs to group chat and meetings is available only in public developer preview.
  • To extend your static tabs to group chat and meetings, use the app manifest v1.16 or later.

You can extend static tabs to group chat and meetings. Instead of pinned app content, you can build tabs that behave more like apps as you can pin only one tab per app, for example, pinning a single YouTube app tab.

To extend your static tabs to group chat and meetings, update your app manifest with the scopes and context parameters in the staticTabs property.

Following is an example of app manifest where a static tab is defined that works in all scopes and contexts in Teams:

"staticTabs": [ 
  { 
     "entityId": "homeTab", 
     "scopes": [ 
       "personal", 
       "groupChat",
       "team"
      ], 
     "context": [ 
       "personalTab",  
       "privateChatTab", 
       "meetingChatTab", 
       "meetingDetailsTab", 
       "meetingSidePanel", 
       "meetingStage",
       "channelTab"
      ], 
      "name": "Contoso", 
      "contentUrl": "https://contoso.com/content (displayed in Teams canvas)", 
      "websiteUrl": "https://contoso.com/content (displayed in web browser)" 
  }
], 

If a context isn't defined in the app manifest, by default Teams consider the following context:

"context": [ 
   "personalTab", 
   "privateChatTab", 
   "meetingChatTab", 
   "meetingDetailsTab", 
   "meetingStage" 
]

Customizing your static tab in chats or meetings

To customize your static tab experience in chats or meetings, you can use the setConfig APIs in your tab to update the contentUrl and websiteUrl. Following is an example:

pages.config.setConfig({ 
  "contentUrl": "https://wwww.contoso.com/teamsapp/thread/" + context.threadId,
   ...}

Only contentUrl and websiteUrl changes are supported for setConfig, other properties can't be changed for static tabs.

Code sample

Sample name Description .NET Node.js Manifest
Tab personal Sample app, which showcases custom personal Tab with ASP.NET core View NA View

Next step

See also