Walkthrough: Write your first client script

Ready to write your first client script to see things in action? Lets get started. We'll keep it simple.

Objective

After completing this walkthrough, you will know how to use JavaScript code in model-driven apps, which involves the following steps at a high level:

  • Locate or create a solution to add your work to
  • Write JavaScript code to address a business issue
  • Upload your code as a web resource
  • Associate your web resource to a form
  • Configure form and field events
  • Test your code

Step 1: Locate or create a solution

Solutions are the way that customizations can be transported from one environment to another. You should write and test your Javascript code in a development environment as part of an unmanaged solution. When you have finished testing, export the solution as a managed solution and import/install it in your production environment.

There may already be an existing solution that you should use. The model-driven app you want to customize with your script should already be part of a solution. You may edit that solution or create a new solution that depends on another existing solution.

To create a new solution:

  1. Navigate to Power Apps.

  2. In the left navigation pane, select Solutions and then select New solution.

  3. In the fly-out dialog, specify Display name, Name, and Publisher.

    Most companies will have an existing publisher that they will always use. You should use that publisher. If you are the very first person, you get to create your own.

    Click New Publisher to open the New Publisher dialog. In this walkthrough, we will use a publisher with this definition:

    Form to create a new publisher with information for Example Publisher

    Notice the Prefix value. This should be something that identifies your company. In this case, we are using example.

    This is the solution we will use in this walkthrough

    Solution form for the First Client Script Solution

  4. Locate or add a model-driven app to your solution.

    A new solution will not have any model-driven apps included in it. You will need to add an existing model-driven app or create a new one.

    Note

    For the purpose of this walkthrough, make sure the app includes the Account table. The scripts and instructions below expects fields found in a form for the Account table.

    Option A: Add an existing model-driven app to your solution

    1. In your solution, select Add existing > App > Model-driven app.

    Add existing model-driven app

    1. Select an existing app and click Add.

    Option B: Create a new model-driven app in your solution

    In your solution, you can select New > App > Model-driven app.

    See the Build your first model-driven app tutorial. Create an app that includes the Account table.

Step 2: Write your JavaScript code

The first step is to identify the business issue you are trying to address using client scripting. Once you have identified it, you need to write your JavaScript code containing the custom business logic that addresses your business issue.

Model-driven apps do not provide a JavaScript editor. Use an external authoring tool that provides features to specifically support editing JavaScript files, such as Notepad++, Visual Studio Code, or Microsoft Visual Studio.

This is the JavaScript code that this walkthrough uses:

// A namespace defined for the sample code
// As a best practice, you should always define 
// a unique namespace for your libraries
var Example = window.Example || {};
(function () {
    // Define some global variables
    var myUniqueId = "_myUniqueId"; // Define an ID for the notification
    var currentUserName = Xrm.Utility.getGlobalContext().userSettings.userName; // get current user name
    var message = currentUserName + ": Your JavaScript code in action!";

    // Code to run in the form OnLoad event
    this.formOnLoad = function (executionContext) {
        var formContext = executionContext.getFormContext();

        // Display the form level notification as an INFO
        formContext.ui.setFormNotification(message, "INFO", myUniqueId);

        // Wait for 5 seconds before clearing the notification
        window.setTimeout(function () { formContext.ui.clearFormNotification(myUniqueId); }, 5000);
    }

    // Code to run in the column OnChange event 
    this.attributeOnChange = function (executionContext) {
        var formContext = executionContext.getFormContext();

        // Automatically set some column values if the account name contains "Contoso"
        var accountName = formContext.getAttribute("name").getValue();
        if (accountName.toLowerCase().search("contoso") != -1) {
            formContext.getAttribute("websiteurl").setValue("https://www.contoso.com");
            formContext.getAttribute("telephone1").setValue("425-555-0100");
            formContext.getAttribute("description").setValue("Website URL, Phone and Description set using custom script.");
        }
    }

    // Code to run in the form OnSave event 
    this.formOnSave = function () {
        // Display an alert dialog
        Xrm.Navigation.openAlertDialog({ text: "Record saved." });
    }
}).call(Example);

Copy this code into a text file and save it with the name: Example-form-script.js.

Detailed code explanation

Let's look at the code in detail:

  • Define namespace: The code starts by defining a namespace for your custom script. As a best practice, you should always create namespaced JavaScript libraries to avoid having your functions overridden by functions in another library.

    var Example = window.Example || {};
    

    In this case, all the functions defined in this library can be used as Example.[functionName]. You should choose a namespace that matches your solution publisher name.

  • Define global variables: The following section defines some global variables to be used in the script. Context information is available globally using the Xrm.Utility.getGlobalContext method.

    // Define some global variables
    var myUniqueId = "_myUniqueId"; // Define an ID for the notification
    var currentUserName = Xrm.Utility.getGlobalContext().userSettings.userName; // get current user name
    var message = currentUserName + ": Your JavaScript code in action!";
    
  • Function to execute on the OnLoad event: This section contains the function that will be executed when the account form loads. For example, when you create a new account record or when you open an existing account record.

    The Example.formOnLoad function uses the executionContext parameter to get the formContext object. When you attach your code with the form event later, you must remember to select the option to pass the execution context to this function.

    This function displays a form level notification using the formContext.ui.setFormNotification method.

    Finally, this function uses the JavaScript setTimeOut method to delay the execution of the formContext.ui.clearFormNotification method to clear the notification after 5 seconds.

    // Code to run in the form OnLoad event
    this.formOnLoad = function (executionContext) {
        var formContext = executionContext.getFormContext();
    
        // Display the form level notification as an INFO
        formContext.ui.setFormNotification(message, "INFO", myUniqueId);
    
        // Wait for 5 seconds before clearing the notification
        window.setTimeout(function () { formContext.ui.clearFormNotification(myUniqueId); }, 5000);        
    }
    
  • Function to execute on the OnChange event: The Example.attributeOnChange function will be associated with the Account Name column in the account form so that it gets executed only when you change the account name value.

    This function performs a case-insensitive search for Contoso in the account name, and if present, sets values for the websiteurl, telephone1, and description columns in the account form.

    // Code to run in the column OnChange event 
    this.attributeOnChange = function (executionContext) {
        var formContext = executionContext.getFormContext();
    
        // Automatically set some column values if the account name contains "Contoso"
        var accountName = formContext.getAttribute("name").getValue();
        if (accountName.toLowerCase().search("contoso") != -1) {
            formContext.getAttribute("websiteurl").setValue("https://www.contoso.com");
            formContext.getAttribute("telephone1").setValue("425-555-0100");
            formContext.getAttribute("description").setValue("Website URL, Phone and Description set using custom script.");
        }
    }
    
  • Function to execute on the OnSave event: The Example.formOnSave function displays an alert dialog box using the Xrm.Navigation.openAlertDialog method. This dialog box displays a message with an OK button. The user can close the alert by clicking OK.

    Note

    This function doesn't use the execution context because the Xrm.Navigation. methods don't require them.

    // Code to run in the form OnSave event 
    this.formOnSave = function () {
        // Display an alert dialog
        Xrm.Navigation.openAlertDialog({ text: "Record saved." });
    }
    

Step 3: Upload your code as a web resource

Now that your code is ready, you need to upload it into your solution.

  1. In your solution select New > More > Web resource

    Add a new web resource to your solution

  2. In the New web resource dialog, click Choose file and select the Example-form-script.js file you saved earlier.

  3. Type in the Display name, Name, and optionally a Description. Make sure the Type is JavaScript (JS).

    New web resource dialog to create example form script

    Note

    • Notice how the Name has a prefix that matches the solution publisher customization prefix. There are other ways to create web resources, but creating a web resource this way ensures that the Web Resource is part of your solution.
    • The name of the web resource is example_example-form-script.

Step 4: Associate your web resource to a form

  1. In your solution, select Objects > Apps > Your App and click Edit.

    Edit the app in the solution

  2. Expand Account and select the Account form, click the ellipses (...) to the right of the Information form and select Edit.

    Edit the account information form

  3. In the left navigation, select Form Libraries and click Add library.

    Add library to form

  4. In the Add JavaScript Library dialog, search for the JavaScript web resource you created by name: Example Script.

    Add JavaScript Library dialog

  5. Select the Example Script web resource and click Add.

Step 5: Configure form and field events

  1. Select the Events tab.

    Form event handlers

Configure form On Load event

  1. Select On Load event handler and click + Event Handler.

    Configure form On Load handler

    Make sure that:

    • The Event Type is On Load.
    • The example_example-form-script library is selected.
    1. Type the name of the function in the Function field. In this case Example.formOnLoad.
    2. Select Pass execution context as first parameter.
    3. Click Done.

Configure Form On Save event

  1. Select On Save event handler and click + Event Handler.

    Configure form On Save handler

    Make sure that:

    • The Event Type is On Save.
    • The example_example-form-script library is selected.
    1. Type the name of the function in the Function field. In this case Example.formOnSave.

      Note

      It is not necessary to elect Pass execution context as first parameter for this function because it doesn't use it.

    2. Click Done

Configure Field On Change event

  1. Select the Account Name field and the Events tab.

    Select Account Name field events

  2. Select the On Change event handler and click + Event Handler.

    Configure field OnChange handler

    Make sure that:

    • The Event Type is On Change.
    • The example_example-form-script library is selected.
    1. Type the name of the function in the Function field. In this case Example.attributeOnChange.
    2. Select Pass execution context as first parameter.
    3. Click Done

Save and publish your changes

Save the form an click Publish.

Step 6: Test your code

It is recommended that you refresh your browser for the changes to take effect in your model-driven apps instance.

To test your code:

  1. Navigate to Power Apps.

  2. In the left navigation area select Apps.

  3. Double-click the model-driven app you just edited, or select it and click Play.

    Open the app to test

Test form On Load function

  1. Click on any account record in the list to open it.

  2. Verify that the notification appears.

    Notification on form load

  3. Verify the notification disappears in 5 seconds.

Test field On Change function

  1. Edit the Account Name to include "Contoso" in the name and move to the next column by pressing TAB.

  2. Verify the expected values set to the Main Phone, Website, and Description columns.

    Values set on field change

Test form On Save function

  1. Click Save.

  2. Verify that the alert dialog with a message that you configured in your code.

    Alert Dialog when form saved

  3. Click OK to close the alert.

See also

Debug your JavaScript code for model-driven apps
Events in forms and grids in model-driven apps
Form OnLoad event
Form OnSave event (Client API reference) in model-driven apps
Column OnChange event (Client API reference)