ASP.NET Core Blazor startup

Note

This isn't the latest version of this article. For the current release, see the ASP.NET Core 8.0 version of this article.

This article explains Blazor app startup configuration.

For general guidance on ASP.NET Core app configuration for server-side development, see Configuration in ASP.NET Core.

Throughout this article, the terms server/server-side and client/client-side are used to distinguish locations where app code executes:

  • Server/server-side: Interactive server-side rendering (interactive SSR) of a Blazor Web App.
  • Client/client-side
    • Client-side rendering (CSR) of a Blazor Web App.
    • A Blazor WebAssembly app.

Documentation component examples usually don't configure an interactive render mode with an @rendermode directive in the component's definition file (.razor):

  • In a Blazor Web App, the component must have an interactive render mode applied, either in the component's definition file or inherited from a parent component. For more information, see ASP.NET Core Blazor render modes.

  • In a standalone Blazor WebAssembly app, the components function as shown and don't require a render mode because components always run interactively on WebAssembly in a Blazor WebAssembly app.

When using the Interactive WebAssembly or Interactive Auto render modes, component code sent to the client can be decompiled and inspected. Don't place private code, app secrets, or other sensitive information in client-rendered components.

  • Server/server-side
    • The Server project of a hosted Blazor WebAssembly app.
    • A Blazor Server app.
  • Client/client-side
    • The Client project of a hosted Blazor WebAssembly app.
    • A Blazor WebAssembly app.

For guidance on the purpose and locations of files and folders, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure, which also describes the location of the Blazor start script and the location of <head> and <body> content.

The best way to run the demonstration code is to download the BlazorSample_{PROJECT TYPE} sample apps from the Blazor samples GitHub repository that matches the version of .NET that you're targeting. Not all of the documentation examples are currently in the sample apps, but an effort is currently underway to move most of the .NET 8 article examples into the .NET 8 sample apps. This work will be completed in the first quarter of 2024.

Startup process and configuration

The Blazor startup process is automatic and asynchronous via the Blazor script (blazor.*.js), where the * placeholder is:

  • web for a Blazor Web App
  • server for a Blazor Server app
  • webassembly for a Blazor WebAssembly app

The Blazor startup process is automatic and asynchronous via the Blazor script (blazor.*.js), where the * placeholder is:

  • server for a Blazor Server app
  • webassembly for a Blazor WebAssembly app

For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

To manually start Blazor:

Blazor Web App:

  • Add an autostart="false" attribute and value to the Blazor <script> tag.
  • Place a script that calls Blazor.start() after the Blazor <script> tag and inside the closing </body> tag.
  • Place static server-side rendering (static SSR) options in the ssr property.
  • Place server-side Blazor-SignalR circuit options in the circuit property.
  • Place client-side WebAssembly options in the webAssembly property.
<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  ...
  Blazor.start({
    ssr: {
      ...
    },
    circuit: {
      ...
    },
    webAssembly: {
      ...
    }
  });
  ...
</script>

Standalone Blazor WebAssembly and Blazor Server:

  • Add an autostart="false" attribute and value to the Blazor <script> tag.
  • Place a script that calls Blazor.start() after the Blazor <script> tag and inside the closing </body> tag.
  • You can provide additional options in the Blazor.start() parameter.
<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  ...
  Blazor.start({
    ...
  });
  ...
</script>

In the preceding example, the {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

JavaScript initializers

JavaScript (JS) initializers execute logic before and after a Blazor app loads. JS initializers are useful in the following scenarios:

  • Customizing how a Blazor app loads.
  • Initializing libraries before Blazor starts up.
  • Configuring Blazor settings.

JS initializers are detected as part of the build process and imported automatically. Use of JS initializers often removes the need to manually trigger script functions from the app when using Razor class libraries (RCLs).

To define a JS initializer, add a JS module to the project named {NAME}.lib.module.js, where the {NAME} placeholder is the assembly name, library name, or package identifier. Place the file in the project's web root, which is typically the wwwroot folder.

For Blazor Web Apps:

  • beforeWebStart(options): Called before the Blazor Web App starts. For example, beforeWebStart is used to customize the loading process, logging level, and other options. Receives the Blazor Web options (options).
  • afterWebStarted(blazor): Called after all beforeWebStart promises resolve. For example, afterWebStarted can be used to register Blazor event listeners and custom event types. The Blazor instance is passed to afterWebStarted as an argument (blazor).
  • beforeServerStart(options, extensions): Called before the first Server runtime is started. Receives SignalR circuit start options (options) and any extensions (extensions) added during publishing.
  • afterServerStarted(blazor): Called after the first Interactive Server runtime is started.
  • beforeWebAssemblyStart(options, extensions): Called before the Interactive WebAssembly runtime is started. Receives the Blazor options (options) and any extensions (extensions) added during publishing. For example, options can specify the use of a custom boot resource loader.
  • afterWebAssemblyStarted(blazor): Called after the Interactive WebAssembly runtime is started.

Note

Legacy JS initializers (beforeStart, afterStarted) are not invoked by default in a Blazor Web App. You can enable the legacy initializers to run with the enableClassicInitializers option. However, legacy initializer execution is unpredictable.

<script>
  Blazor.start({ enableClassicInitializers: true });
</script>

For Blazor Server, Blazor WebAssembly, and Blazor Hybrid apps:

  • beforeStart(options, extensions): Called before Blazor starts. For example, beforeStart is used to customize the loading process, logging level, and other options specific to the hosting model.
    • Client-side, beforeStart receives the Blazor options (options) and any extensions (extensions) added during publishing. For example, options can specify the use of a custom boot resource loader.
    • Server-side, beforeStart receives SignalR circuit start options (options).
    • In a BlazorWebView, no options are passed.
  • afterStarted(blazor): Called after Blazor is ready to receive calls from JS. For example, afterStarted is used to initialize libraries by making JS interop calls and registering custom elements. The Blazor instance is passed to afterStarted as an argument (blazor).

Additional .NET WebAssembly runtime callbacks:

  • onRuntimeConfigLoaded(config): Called when the boot configuration is downloaded. Allows the app to modify parameters (config) before the runtime starts (the parameter is MonoConfig from dotnet.d.ts):

    export function onRuntimeConfigLoaded(config) {
      // Sample: Enable startup diagnostic logging when the URL contains 
      // parameter debug=1
      const params = new URLSearchParams(location.search);
      if (params.get("debug") == "1") {
        config.diagnosticTracing = true;
      }
    }
    
  • onRuntimeReady({ getAssemblyExports, getConfig }): Called after the .NET WebAssembly runtime has started (the parameter is RuntimeAPI from dotnet.d.ts):

    export function onRuntimeReady({ getAssemblyExports, getConfig }) {
      // Sample: After the runtime starts, but before Main method is called, 
      // call [JSExport]ed method.
      const config = getConfig();
      const exports = await getAssemblyExports(config.mainAssemblyName);
      exports.Sample.Greet();
    }
    

Both callbacks can return a Promise, and the promise is awaited before the startup continues.

For the file name:

  • If the JS initializers are consumed as a static asset in the project, use the format {ASSEMBLY NAME}.lib.module.js, where the {ASSEMBLY NAME} placeholder is the app's assembly name. For example, name the file BlazorSample.lib.module.js for a project with an assembly name of BlazorSample. Place the file in the app's wwwroot folder.
  • If the JS initializers are consumed from an RCL, use the format {LIBRARY NAME/PACKAGE ID}.lib.module.js, where the {LIBRARY NAME/PACKAGE ID} placeholder is the project's library name or package identifier. For example, name the file RazorClassLibrary1.lib.module.js for an RCL with a package identifier of RazorClassLibrary1. Place the file in the library's wwwroot folder.

For Blazor Web Apps:

The following example demonstrates JS initializers that load custom scripts before and after the Blazor Web App has started by appending them to the <head> in beforeWebStart and afterWebStarted:

export function beforeWebStart() {
  var customScript = document.createElement('script');
  customScript.setAttribute('src', 'beforeStartScripts.js');
  document.head.appendChild(customScript);
}

export function afterWebStarted() {
  var customScript = document.createElement('script');
  customScript.setAttribute('src', 'afterStartedScripts.js');
  document.head.appendChild(customScript);
}

The preceding beforeWebStart example only guarantees that the custom script loads before Blazor starts. It doesn't guarantee that awaited promises in the script complete their execution before Blazor starts.

For Blazor Server, Blazor WebAssembly, and Blazor Hybrid apps:

The following example demonstrates JS initializers that load custom scripts before and after Blazor has started by appending them to the <head> in beforeStart and afterStarted:

export function beforeStart(options, extensions) {
  var customScript = document.createElement('script');
  customScript.setAttribute('src', 'beforeStartScripts.js');
  document.head.appendChild(customScript);
}

export function afterStarted(blazor) {
  var customScript = document.createElement('script');
  customScript.setAttribute('src', 'afterStartedScripts.js');
  document.head.appendChild(customScript);
}

The preceding beforeStart example only guarantees that the custom script loads before Blazor starts. It doesn't guarantee that awaited promises in the script complete their execution before Blazor starts.

Note

MVC and Razor Pages apps don't automatically load JS initializers. However, developer code can include a script to fetch the app's manifest and trigger the load of the JS initializers.

For an examples of JS initializers, see the following resources:

Note

Documentation links to .NET reference source usually load the repository's default branch, which represents the current development for the next release of .NET. To select a tag for a specific release, use the Switch branches or tags dropdown list. For more information, see How to select a version tag of ASP.NET Core source code (dotnet/AspNetCore.Docs #26205).

Ensure libraries are loaded in a specific order

Append custom scripts to the <head> in beforeStart and afterStarted in the order that they should load.

The following example loads script1.js before script2.js and script3.js before script4.js:

export function beforeStart(options, extensions) {
    var customScript1 = document.createElement('script');
    customScript1.setAttribute('src', 'script1.js');
    document.head.appendChild(customScript1);

    var customScript2 = document.createElement('script');
    customScript2.setAttribute('src', 'script2.js');
    document.head.appendChild(customScript2);
}

export function afterStarted(blazor) {
    var customScript1 = document.createElement('script');
    customScript1.setAttribute('src', 'script3.js');
    document.head.appendChild(customScript1);

    var customScript2 = document.createElement('script');
    customScript2.setAttribute('src', 'script4.js');
    document.head.appendChild(customScript2);
}

Import additional modules

Use top-level import statements in the JS initializers file to import additional modules.

additionalModule.js:

export function logMessage() {
  console.log('logMessage is logging');
}

In the JS initializers file (.lib.module.js):

import { logMessage } from "/additionalModule.js";

export function beforeStart(options, extensions) {
  ...

  logMessage();
}

Import map

Import maps are supported by ASP.NET Core and Blazor.

Initialize Blazor when the document is ready

The following example starts Blazor when the document is ready:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function() {
    Blazor.start();
  });
</script>

In the preceding example, the {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

Chain to the Promise that results from a manual start

To perform additional tasks, such as JS interop initialization, use then to chain to the Promise that results from a manual Blazor app start:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start().then(function () {
    ...
  });
</script>

In the preceding example, the {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

Note

For a library to automatically execute additional tasks after Blazor has started, use a JavaScript initializer. Use of a JS initializer doesn't require the consumer of the library to chain JS calls to Blazor's manual start.

Load client-side boot resources

When an app loads in the browser, the app downloads boot resources from the server:

  • JavaScript code to bootstrap the app
  • .NET runtime and assemblies
  • Locale specific data

Customize how these boot resources are loaded using the loadBootResource API. The loadBootResource function overrides the built-in boot resource loading mechanism. Use loadBootResource for the following scenarios:

  • Load static resources, such as timezone data or dotnet.wasm, from a CDN.
  • Load compressed assemblies using an HTTP request and decompress them on the client for hosts that don't support fetching compressed contents from the server.
  • Alias resources to a different name by redirecting each fetch request to a new name.

Note

External sources must return the required Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) headers for browsers to allow cross-origin resource loading. CDNs usually provide the required headers by default.

loadBootResource parameters appear in the following table.

Parameter Description
type The type of the resource. Permissible types include: assembly, pdb, dotnetjs, dotnetwasm, and timezonedata. You only need to specify types for custom behaviors. Types not specified to loadBootResource are loaded by the framework per their default loading behaviors. The dotnetjs boot resource (dotnet.*.js) must either return null for default loading behavior or a URI for the source of the dotnetjs boot resource.
name The name of the resource.
defaultUri The relative or absolute URI of the resource.
integrity The integrity string representing the expected content in the response.

The loadBootResource function can return a URI string to override the loading process. In the following example, the following files from bin/Release/{TARGET FRAMEWORK}/wwwroot/_framework are served from a CDN at https://cdn.example.com/blazorwebassembly/{VERSION}/:

  • dotnet.*.js
  • dotnet.wasm
  • Timezone data

The {TARGET FRAMEWORK} placeholder is the target framework moniker (for example, net7.0). The {VERSION} placeholder is the shared framework version (for example, 7.0.0).

Blazor Web App:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    webAssembly: {
      loadBootResource: function (type, name, defaultUri, integrity) {
        console.log(`Loading: '${type}', '${name}', '${defaultUri}', '${integrity}'`);
        switch (type) {
          case 'dotnetjs':
          case 'dotnetwasm':
          case 'timezonedata':
            return `https://cdn.example.com/blazorwebassembly/{VERSION}/${name}`;
        }
      }
    }
  });
</script>

Standalone Blazor WebAssembly:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    loadBootResource: function (type, name, defaultUri, integrity) {
      console.log(`Loading: '${type}', '${name}', '${defaultUri}', '${integrity}'`);
      switch (type) {
        case 'dotnetjs':
        case 'dotnetwasm':
        case 'timezonedata':
          return `https://cdn.example.com/blazorwebassembly/{VERSION}/${name}`;
      }
    }
  });
</script>

In the preceding example, the {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

To customize more than just the URLs for boot resources, the loadBootResource function can call fetch directly and return the result. The following example adds a custom HTTP header to the outbound requests. To retain the default integrity checking behavior, pass through the integrity parameter.

Blazor Web App:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    webAssembly: {
      loadBootResource: function (type, name, defaultUri, integrity) {
        if (type == 'dotnetjs') {
          return null;
        } else {
          return fetch(defaultUri, {
            cache: 'no-cache',
            integrity: integrity,
            headers: { 'Custom-Header': 'Custom Value' }
          });
        }
      }
    }
  });
</script>

Standalone Blazor WebAssembly:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    loadBootResource: function (type, name, defaultUri, integrity) {
      if (type == 'dotnetjs') {
        return null;
      } else {
        return fetch(defaultUri, {
          cache: 'no-cache',
          integrity: integrity,
          headers: { 'Custom-Header': 'Custom Value' }
        });
      }
    }
  });
</script>

In the preceding example, the {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

When the loadBootResource function returns null, Blazor uses the default loading behavior for the resource. For example, the preceding code returns null for the dotnetjs boot resource (dotnet.*.js) because the dotnetjs boot resource must either return null for default loading behavior or a URI for the source of the dotnetjs boot resource.

The loadBootResource function can also return a Response promise. For an example, see Host and deploy ASP.NET Core Blazor WebAssembly.

Control headers in C# code

Control headers at startup in C# code using the following approaches.

In the following examples, a Content Security Policy (CSP) is applied to the app via a CSP header. The {POLICY STRING} placeholder is the CSP policy string.

Server-side and prerendered client-side scenarios

Use ASP.NET Core Middleware to control the headers collection.

In the Program file:

In Startup.Configure of Startup.cs:

app.Use(async (context, next) =>
{
    context.Response.Headers.Append("Content-Security-Policy", "{POLICY STRING}");
    await next();
});

The preceding example uses inline middleware, but you can also create a custom middleware class and call the middleware with an extension method in the Program file. For more information, see Write custom ASP.NET Core middleware.

Client-side development without prerendering

Pass StaticFileOptions to MapFallbackToFile that specifies response headers at the OnPrepareResponse stage.

In the server-side Program file:

In Startup.Configure of Startup.cs:

var staticFileOptions = new StaticFileOptions
{
    OnPrepareResponse = context =>
    {
        context.Context.Response.Headers.Append("Content-Security-Policy", 
            "{POLICY STRING}");
    }
};

...

app.MapFallbackToFile("index.html", staticFileOptions);

For more information on CSPs, see Enforce a Content Security Policy for ASP.NET Core Blazor.

Client-side loading progress indicators

A loading progress indicator shows the loading progress of the app to users, indicating that the app is loading normally and that the user should wait until loading is finished.

Blazor Web App loading progress

The loading progress indicator used in Blazor WebAssembly apps isn't present in an app created from the Blazor Web App project template. Usually, a loading progress indicator isn't desirable for interactive WebAssembly components because Blazor Web Apps prerender client-side components on the server for fast initial load times. For mixed-render-mode situations, the framework or developer code must also be careful to avoid the following problems:

  • Showing multiple loading indicators on the same rendered page.
  • Inadvertently discarding prerendered content while the WebAssembly runtime is loading.

A future release of .NET might provide a framework-based loading progress indicator. In the meantime, you can add a custom loading progress indicator to a Blazor Web App.

Create a LoadingProgress component in the .Client app that calls OperatingSystem.IsBrowser:

  • When false, display a loading progress indicator while the Blazor bundle is downloaded and before the Blazor runtime activates on the client.
  • When true, render the requested component's content.

The following demonstration uses the loading progress indicator found in apps created from the Blazor WebAssembly template, including a modification of the styles that the template provides. The styles are loaded into the app's <head> content by the HeadContent component. For more information, see Control head content in ASP.NET Core Blazor apps.

LoadingProgress.razor:

@if (!OperatingSystem.IsBrowser())
{
    <HeadContent>
        <style>
            .loading-progress {
                position: relative;
                display: block;
                width: 8rem;
                height: 8rem;
                margin: 20vh auto 1rem auto;
            }

                .loading-progress circle {
                    fill: none;
                    stroke: #e0e0e0;
                    stroke-width: 0.6rem;
                    transform-origin: 50% 50%;
                    transform: rotate(-90deg);
                }

                    .loading-progress circle:last-child {
                        stroke: #1b6ec2;
                        stroke-dasharray: 
                            calc(3.141 * var(--blazor-load-percentage, 0%) * 0.8), 
                            500%;
                        transition: stroke-dasharray 0.05s ease-in-out;
                    }

            .loading-progress-text {
                position: relative;
                text-align: center;
                font-weight: bold;
                top: -90px;
            }

                .loading-progress-text:after {
                    content: var(--blazor-load-percentage-text, "Loading");
                }

            code {
                color: #c02d76;
            }
        </style>
    </HeadContent>
    <svg class="loading-progress">
        <circle r="40%" cx="50%" cy="50%" />
        <circle r="40%" cx="50%" cy="50%" />
    </svg>
    <div class="loading-progress-text"></div>
}
else
{
    @ChildContent
}

@code {
    [Parameter]
    public RenderFragment? ChildContent { get; set; }
}

In a component that adopts Interactive WebAssembly rendering, wrap the component's Razor markup with the LoadingProgress component. The following example demonstrates the approach with the Counter component of an app created from the Blazor Web App project template.

Pages/Counter.razor:

@page "/counter"
@rendermode InteractiveWebAssembly

<PageTitle>Counter</PageTitle>

<LoadingProgress>
    <h1>Counter</h1>

    <p role="status">Current count: @currentCount</p>

    <button class="btn btn-primary" @onclick="IncrementCount">Click me</button>
</LoadingProgress>

@code {
    private int currentCount = 0;

    private void IncrementCount()
    {
        currentCount++;
    }
}

Blazor WebAssembly app loading progress

The project template contains Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and text indicators that show the loading progress of the app.

The progress indicators are implemented with HTML and CSS using two CSS custom properties (variables) provided by Blazor:

  • --blazor-load-percentage: The percentage of app files loaded.
  • --blazor-load-percentage-text: The percentage of app files loaded, rounded to the nearest whole number.

Using the preceding CSS variables, you can create custom progress indicators that match the styling of your app.

In the following example:

  • resourcesLoaded is an instantaneous count of the resources loaded during app startup.
  • totalResources is the total number of resources to load.
const percentage = resourcesLoaded / totalResources * 100;
document.documentElement.style.setProperty(
  '--blazor-load-percentage', `${percentage}%`);
document.documentElement.style.setProperty(
  '--blazor-load-percentage-text', `"${Math.floor(percentage)}%"`);

The default round progress indicator is implemented in HTML in the wwwroot/index.html file:

<div id="app">
    <svg class="loading-progress">
        <circle r="40%" cx="50%" cy="50%" />
        <circle r="40%" cx="50%" cy="50%" />
    </svg>
    <div class="loading-progress-text"></div>
</div>

To review the project template markup and styling for the default progress indicators, see the ASP.NET Core reference source:

Note

Documentation links to .NET reference source usually load the repository's default branch, which represents the current development for the next release of .NET. To select a tag for a specific release, use the Switch branches or tags dropdown list. For more information, see How to select a version tag of ASP.NET Core source code (dotnet/AspNetCore.Docs #26205).

Instead of using the default round progress indicator, the following example shows how to implement a linear progress indicator.

Add the following styles to wwwroot/css/app.css:

.linear-progress {
    background: silver;
    width: 50vw;
    margin: 20% auto;
    height: 1rem;
    border-radius: 10rem;
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
}

.linear-progress:after {
    content: '';
    position: absolute;
    inset: 0;
    background: blue;
    scale: var(--blazor-load-percentage, 0%) 100%;
    transform-origin: left top;
    transition: scale ease-out 0.5s;
}

A CSS variable (var(...)) is used to pass the value of --blazor-load-percentage to the scale property of a blue pseudo-element that indicates the loading progress of the app's files. As the app loads, --blazor-load-percentage is updated automatically, which dynamically changes the progress indicator's visual representation.

In wwwroot/index.html, remove the default SVG round indicator in <div id="app">...</div> and replace it with the following markup:

<div class="linear-progress"></div>

Configure the .NET WebAssembly runtime

In advanced programming scenarios, the configureRuntime function with the dotnet runtime host builder is used to configure the .NET WebAssembly runtime. For example, dotnet.withEnvironmentVariable sets an environment variable that:

  • Configures the .NET WebAssembly runtime.
  • Changes the behavior of a C library.

The configureRuntime function can also be used to enable integration with a browser profiler.

In the following examples that set an environment variable:

  • The {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.
  • The {NAME} placeholder is the environment variable's name.
  • The {VALUE} placeholder is the environment variable's value.

Blazor Web App:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    webAssembly: {
      configureRuntime: dotnet => {
        dotnet.withEnvironmentVariable("{NAME}", "{VALUE}");
      }
    }
  });
</script>

Standalone Blazor WebAssembly:

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    configureRuntime: dotnet => {
      dotnet.withEnvironmentVariable("{NAME}", "{VALUE}");
    }
  });
</script>

Note

The .NET runtime instance can be accessed using the Blazor WebAssembly Runtime API (Blazor.runtime). For example, the app's build configuration can be obtained using Blazor.runtime.runtimeBuildInfo.buildConfiguration.

For more information on the .NET WebAssembly runtime configuration, see the runtime's TypeScript definition file (dotnet.d.ts) in the dotnet/runtime GitHub repository.

Note

Documentation links to .NET reference source usually load the repository's default branch, which represents the current development for the next release of .NET. To select a tag for a specific release, use the Switch branches or tags dropdown list. For more information, see How to select a version tag of ASP.NET Core source code (dotnet/AspNetCore.Docs #26205).

Disable enhanced navigation and form handling

This section applies to Blazor Web Apps.

To disable enhanced navigation and form handling, set disableDomPreservation to true for Blazor.start.

<script src="{BLAZOR SCRIPT}" autostart="false"></script>
<script>
  Blazor.start({
    ssr: { disableDomPreservation: true }
  });
</script>

In the preceding example, the {BLAZOR SCRIPT} placeholder is the Blazor script path and file name. For the location of the script, see ASP.NET Core Blazor project structure.

Additional resources